queen

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Related to queenship: Queenship of Mary

queen

Sociology
A commonly used but derogatory term for a male homosexual, especially one who is flamboyantly effeminate.

Vox populi
A female monarch.

queen

a mature, entire female cat used for breeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
This elegant book demonstrates the scriptural basis of the queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary, which Catholics normally know through Tradition, the Magisterium, the liturgy, popular piety, and art.
Surely, however, Mears incorrectly judges that all Elizabeth's queenship had going for it was luck and longevity.
A brief look at the Second Intermediate Period, here defined as including the 13th dynasty, notes the introduction of the title "great wife of the king," as well as the double feather crown, both elements characteristic of the queenship of the New Kingdom.
Volume VIII of "Prepare for the Great Tribulation and the Era of Peace," put out by tiny Queenship Publishing Company in Santa Barbara, Calif.
BOAT BRANDS SCHEDULED TO EXHIBIT Queenship Rodman USA Mainship Sunseeker Pursuit Hampton Baia Boston Whaler Navigator Fleming Riviera Fairline Chris Craft Cruiser Yachts Silverton Formula Beneteau Island Packet Rampage Catalina Glacier Bay Parker Jeanneau Maxum Cranchi Chaparral Hunter Bertram Fountain Selene Meridian Eliminator Mikelson W.
He discusses celebrating the brides of Christ, the poet of empire, the chronicler of self, and queenship and kingship in occasional works.
The Egyptian Priests' praise for Cleopatra's "Honour" in the first stanza of the last song, with their command in the last stanza to "Set Cleopatra on the throne" more unambiguously evokes restoration of monarchy, particularly queenship.
Nuria Silleras-Fernandez's Power, Piety, and Patronage in Late Medieval Queenship analyzes the reign of Maria de Luna, queen of Aragon (1396-1406).
Orual-Psyche's hard tasks continue with her exercise of queenship.
Duke University Press, 1992), 86-105, and 264-78; the late-tenth-century "vita antiquior" of the Ottonian Queen Mathilda, most likely written by a nun at one of her foundations (Nordhausen or Quedlinburg), translated in Sean Gilsdorf, Queenship and Sanctity: The Lives of Mathilda and the Epitaph of Adelheid (Washington, D.
She reads the earlier play both as a celebration of Elizabeth's queenship and, at the same time, as a text that reveals "the problems attendant upon female rule" (39).

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