electron

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electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

electron

/elec·tron/ (e-lek´tron) an elementary particle with the unit quantum of (negative) charge, constituting the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity.electron´ic

electron

[ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, elektron, amber
1 a negatively charged elementary particle that has a specific charge, mass, and spin. The number of electrons associated with the nucleus of an atom is equal to the atomic number of the substance.
2 a negative beta particle emitted from a radioactive substance. See also atom, element, ion, neutron, proton.

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

electron (i·lekˑ·trn),

n the negatively charged particle that orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]

electron (e) (ēlek´tron),

n a negatively charged elementary particle constituent in every neutral atom, with a mass of 0.000549. (Particles with an equal but opposite charge are called
positrons.)
electron beam,
n See electron stream.
electron stream,
n (electron beam, cathode ray, cathode stream), a stream of electrons emitted from the negative electrode (cathode) in a roentgen-ray tube; their bombardment of the anode gives rise to the roentgen rays.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we conclude that the equivalence between passive gravitational mass and energy in the absence of gravitational field survives at a macroscopic level for stationary quantum states.
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l) and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST) have developed the fundamental building block for a powerful, future quantum computer by being able to control the superposition of quantum states in a solid-state electron device.
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The sender measures the desired property of particles A and C, thus ruining their quantum states.
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The 14 chapters begin with the theory of relativity and continue through configuration of the atom, quantum state of atoms, electron spin, the Pauli exclusion principle, X-rays, and other topics, ending with a chapter on high-energy physics.
Quantum particles can become entangled, which means that if you look at one particle's quantum state, the entangled particle will have the same state.
Paths 5 and 6 cannot be both distinguishable and indistinguishable for the quantum state [PSI]--this is what the complementarity principle says.

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