qualitative


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Related to qualitative: qualitative variable

qualitative

/qual·i·ta·tive/ (kwahl´ĭ-ta″tiv) pertaining to quality. Cf. quantitative.

qualitative

[kwol′itā′tiv]
Etymology: L, qualis
pertaining to the quality, value, or nature of something.

qualitative

(kwol'i-ta?tiv) [L. qualitativus]
Referring to the quality of anything.
See: quantitative

qualitative

pertaining to observations of a categorical nature, e.g. breed, sex.

qualitative data
data measured on a categorical scale.
qualitative trait
see qualitative trait.
References in periodicals archive ?
The training covered theoretical foundations of qualitative research, common qualitative data gathering tools, development of skills on the use of data collection techniques and development of appropriate tools for specific data collection techniques.
respond: Thematic content analysis is an acceptable method of qualitative research and involves quantifying the number of persons who articulated the various themes.
In an exploratory sequential design, the researcher first collects and analyzes qualitative data, and these findings inform subsequent quantitative data collection (Onwuegbuzie, Bustamante, and Nelson 2010).
his work provides sufficient grounding in ethics relative to research, particular to qualitative methodology.
With recent changes to impairment testing and, specifically, the introduction of optional qualitative assessments to potentially avoid the quantitative tests, entities are seeking insights about how to navigate their way through the impairment-testing process and, where practical, reduce associated costs and complexity.
The next two contributions illustrate the progress that has been made towards the epistemological middle ground by qualitative researchers who start with ontologies and theories that emphasize the crucial importance of texts and contexts.
Jim Bryson, founder of 20|20 Research added, "QualLink(TM) gives quantitative and qualitative researchers the ability to work together to gather quantitative data as well as the qualitative stories behind the numbers quickly and seamlessly.
Without revisiting the paradigm wars that have consumed much time and energy, suffice it to say that disagreements about epistemology contribute to (but are not entirely responsible for) the lack of consensus regarding what is "good" versus what is "bad" qualitative research.
The papers in this special issue contribute to the debates about qualitative data archiving in two key ways.
Also presented are strategies for navigating the handbook, caveats and assumptions, and specific tools for searching for and retrieving qualitative research reports.

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