white poplar

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Related to quaking aspen: bigtooth aspen, Aspen tree

white poplar

Herbal medicine
A deciduous tree that contains essential oil, glycosides, populin and tannins; it is analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic, and is used for rheumatic disease.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Northern white cedar density was four to 10 times greater than the other common species (balsam fir, quaking aspen, and paper birch).
The relationship between selected mechanical properties and age in quaking aspen.
Much of the color in the Sierra comes from quaking aspen (populus tremuloides).
Aspen, or quaking aspen as it is also known, has a short life span.
Groves of golden quaking aspen up in the high country of the Sierra Nevada
A long strip of quaking aspen stretched down the draw to the left, split by a seemingly endless fence that divided the two ranches we were hunting.
Here are thick stands of trees - Douglas fir, blue spruce, quaking aspen - and verdant meadows that burst forth in summer with wildflowers: the bright yellow of the hairy gold aster (that really is its name), the aptly named scarlet bugler, the purple of fleabane and lupine.
The vistas slowly open to encompass seas of quaking aspen and towering mountains.
SNOWBIRD SKI & SUMMER RESORT We could go on about the beauties of the Wasatch Mountains in fall--the quaking aspen shining against mountain granite, the cerulean skies.
These areas are surrounded by stands of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), and narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia).
48, respectively, for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) per newly published Wood Handbook [1], and is assumed to be 16 for quaking aspen (Populus tremoloides)); [v.
Among the notable additions are a 249-point quaking aspen in Coronado National Forest, a 384-point alligator juniper in Prescott National Forest, and a 426-point Arizona sycamore in Aravaipa Canyon.