quadriceps angle

quadriceps angle

Q angle, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unique anatomical features of female athletes such as a larger quadriceps angle ("Q angle")-the angle at which the femur meets the tibia-may cause a greater pull of the knee muscles during physical activity, and contribute to more ACL injuries among females.
The quadriceps angle, or Q angle, also plays an important role in patellofemoral tracking and patellofemoral forces.
As mentioned previously, alterations in the coronal plane can have profound effects on the quadriceps angle, and these often can be visualized with the patient standing; they include genu valgum, a bayonet tibia, squinting or inward facing patellae, and the miserable malalignment syndrome.
On physical examination, check for the quadriceps angle, or Q-angle, which is the angle created between a line drawn from the center of the anterior superior iliac spine on the pelvis to the center of the patella and a second line from the center of the patella to the middle of the tibial tubercle.
Its femoral component features a funnel-shaped patella track that accommodates the quadriceps angle anatomy for both male and female patients, without the need for gender specific components which provides a tremendous inventory savings for all operating rooms.
The Q-angle, or quadriceps angle, is the angle that exists between the thighbone and the pelvis.
Different Q-angles: Men and women have different quadriceps angles (Q-angles)--the angle of the femur as it enters the hip socket.