quadriceps angle

quadriceps angle

Q angle, see there.
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The quadriceps angle, or Q-angle, is defined as the angle formed by the intersection of two lines, one that starts at the anterior iliac spine and goes to the center of the patella, and another that goes from the tibial tuberosity to the center of the patella.
19] Potential contributing factors that have been studied are vastus medialis oblique insufficiency, decreased quadriceps, hamstrings, and ilitibial band flexibility, femoral anteversion, increased quadriceps angle, and patellar hypermobility.
Excessive femoral adduction and internal rotation may increase the dynamic quadriceps angle and lead to greater lateral patellar contact pressure.
One important concept in patella femoral joint function is the quadriceps angle (Q-angle).
The relationship between quadriceps angle and anterior knee pain syndrome.
The quadriceps angle and the incidence of knee injury in Indian long distance runners.
Measuring of the quadriceps angle using standardized foot positions.
The quadriceps angle, or Q angle, also plays an important role in patellofemoral tracking and patellofemoral forces.
As mentioned previously, alterations in the coronal plane can have profound effects on the quadriceps angle, and these often can be visualized with the patient standing; they include genu valgum, a bayonet tibia, squinting or inward facing patellae, and the miserable malalignment syndrome.
On physical examination, check for the quadriceps angle, or Q-angle, which is the angle created between a line drawn from the center of the anterior superior iliac spine on the pelvis to the center of the patella and a second line from the center of the patella to the middle of the tibial tubercle.
Different Q-angles: Men and women have different quadriceps angles (Q-angles)--the angle of the femur as it enters the hip socket.