pyruvate

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pyruvate

 [pi´roo-vāt]
a salt, ester, or anion of pyruvic acid. Pyruvate is the end product of glycolysis and may be metabolized to lactate or to acetyl CoA.

py·ru·vate (Pyr),

(pī'rū-vāt),
A salt or ester of pyruvic acid.

pyruvate

/py·ru·vate/ (pi´roo-vāt) a salt, ester, or anion of pyruvic acid. Pyruvate is the end product of glycolysis and may be metabolized to lactate or to acetyl CoA.

pyruvate

(pī-ro͞o′vāt, pĭ-)
n.
A salt or an ester of pyruvic acid.

py·ru·vate

(pī'rū-vāt)
A salt or ester of pyruvic acid.
Pyruvic acidclick for a larger image
Fig. 264 Pyruvic acid . Molecular structure.

pyruvic acid

or

pyruvate

an important 3-carbon molecule formed from GLUCOSE and GLYCEROL in glycolysis (see Fig. 264 ). See also ACETYLCOENZYME A. Pyruvic acid is broken down further, the precise reactions depending upon whether oxygen is present or not. See AEROBIC RESPIRATION, ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION.

pyruvate (pī·rōōˑ·vāt),

n a biochemical involved in the Krebs cycle that facilitates ATP production. Has been claimed to assist in weight reduction by enhancing metabolism. No known precautions. Also called
sodium pyruvate, calcium pyruvate, potassium pyruvate, magnesium pyruvate, or
dihydroxyacetone pyruvate.

pyruvate

a salt, ester or anion of pyruvic acid. The term is used interchangeably with pyruvic acid. Pyruvate is the end product of glycolysis and may be metabolized in the body to lactate or to acetyl CoA. In yeast it is metabolized to ethanol.

pyruvate carboxylase
an enzyme concerned in the conversion of pyruvate to oxaloacetic acid.
pyruvate dehydrogenase
actively concerned in the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl CoA and CO2.
pyruvate kinase
a glycolytic pathway enzyme (called also PK) which catalyzes the formation of pyruvate from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). A deficiency of the enzyme is a hereditary defect in humans and occurs also in Beagle and Basenji dogs, causing a familial nonspherocytic anemia.
pyruvate transaminase
References in periodicals archive ?
Serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate oxaloacetate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT)
Serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and Serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) enzymes are marker parameters of hepatic cell damage.
Effect of pretreatment of animals with Butea monosperma on TAA- mediated alterations in activities of serum oxaloacetate and pyruvate transaminases (SGOT & SGPT), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and [gamma]- Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) Treatment groups SGOT (IU/l) SGPT (IU/l) Saline-treated control 90.
A number of biochemical markers, such as total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), fasting glucose, uric acid, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels were analyzed by a biochemical autoanalyser (Hitachi-735, Tokyo, Japan) at the Department of Clinical Laboratory of China Medical College Hospital within 4 hours of collection.
The heart damage induced by isoproterenol was indicated by elevated levels of the marker enzymes such as Creatine Kinase-isoenzyme (CK-MB), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Serum Glutamate Oxaloacetic Transaminase (SGOT) and Serum Glutamate Pyruvate Transaminase (SGPT) in serum with increased lipid peroxide and reduced glutathione content in heart homogenates.
Other muscle enzymes, such as glutamate oxalate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and lactate dehydrogenase, were also elevated.
Kits for glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine kinase (CK), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), total proteins, albumin, total bilirubin, urea, uric acid, Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), calcium ion, total cholesterol and triglycerides used for the biochemical studies were supplied by Human Gesellschaft fur Biochemica and Diagnostica MBH, Germany.
Reitman S, Frankel AS (1957) A colorimetric method for the determination of serum glutamate oxaloacetate and glutamate pyruvate transaminase.