pyrolysis


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Related to pyrolysis: gasification

py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis),
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

pyrolysis

[pīrol′isis]
the decomposition of a chemical compound by the application of heat.

py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis)
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis)
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

pyrolysis (pīrol´isis),

n the breaking down of a substance through the application of heat.

pyrolysis

decomposition by heating; said of organic materials.
References in periodicals archive ?
Information about the products yields is needed not only to understand the pyrolysis reaction mechanism, but also to optimize the retorting conditions to obtain gas products of high yield and quality.
Anhydrous pyrolysis can also be used to produce liquid fuel similar to diesel from plastic waste, with a higher cetane value and lower sulphur content than conventional diesel.
This article highlights a step-by-step pyrolysis GC/MS analysis and interpretation of three coating samples focusing on architectural and/or automotive coatings.
Key word: Coal cracking; Tar cracking; Lignite Pyrolysis Char; Catalyst; Activation; Pyrolysis.
The company said these plants will be based on BTL's Fast Pyrolysis Oil (FPO) technology which converts biomass to oil through a rapid pyrolysis process.
Today, studies on torrefaction focus mainly on improving the properties of biomass by upgrading its heating value and the qualities of bio-oil derived from the main pyrolysis stage (Aziz et al.
Gasification or pyrolysis of paint waste or used plastic paint containers as a method for recycling of paint components and the value of these components have been described in the literature.
The samples were kept in an air-tight glassjar and were finally exposed to a temperature of 105oCovernight just before performing the pyrolysis tests.
Using pyrolysis to break down tough feedstocks produces three things: biochar, a gas, and bio-oils that are refined to make "green" gasoline.
Indeed, although scientists have known for over 20 years that plastics can be converted into a fuel-like liquid via pyrolysis, only in the past few years have companies managed to translate this into a commercially viable process.
Using innovative technology, the pyrolysis plant will take used tyres and deconstruct them into their constituent parts, which include carbon black, steel, and oil and gas.
Chemical manufacturers will now be able to use relatively cheaper, widely available pyrolysis oils made from waste wood, agricultural waste and non-food energy crops to produce the same high-value materials for making everything from solvents and detergents to plastics and fibres.