pyrogen


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Related to pyrogen: endotoxin, endogenous pyrogen

pyrogen

 [pi´ro-jen]
an agent that causes fever; called also pyretic and pyrectic. adj., adj pyrogen´ic.
endogenous pyrogen a low-molecular-weight protein that is produced by phagocytic leukocytes in response to stimulation by exogenous pyrogens and released into the circulation; it induces fever by acting on the preoptic area of the hypothalamus to raise the set-point of the hypothalamic thermostat. The pyrogen produced by monocytes and macrophages is not identical to that produced by neutrophils and eosinophils; the mononuclear phagocytes also produce a greater amount of pyrogen for a longer period of time than do the polymorphonuclear cells.
exogenous p's fever-producing agents of external origin, e.g., bacterial endotoxins and other microbial products, antigen-antibody complexes, viruses and synthetic polynucleotides, incompatible blood and blood products, and androgen breakdown products such as etiocholanolone; the action is mediated by endogenous pyrogen.

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen),
A fever-inducing agent; pyrogens are produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

/py·ro·gen/ (pi´ro-jen) a fever-producing substance.

pyrogen

(pī′rə-jən)
n.
A substance that produces fever.

pyrogen

[pī′rəjən]
Etymology: Gk, pyr, fire, genein, to produce
any substance or agent that tends to cause a rise in body temperature, such as some bacterial toxins. See also fever. pyrogenic, adj.

pyrogen

 A fever-inducing substance

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
A fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts; commonly found in distilled water.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

Any substance that causes fever. Endogenous pyrogens are proteins, such as interleukin-1, released by white blood cells in response to bacterial or viral infections. These act on the temperature-regulating centre in the brain, effectively resetting the thermostat at a higher level and causing the muscles to contract repeatedly and rapidly (shivering) so as to raise body temperature.

pyrogen

any substance which alters the body thermostat of HOMOIOTHERMS to a higher setting, giving rise to fever.

Pyrogen

A chemical circulating in the blood that causes a rise in body temperature.
Mentioned in: Fever

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
Fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

an agent that causes fever.

endogenous pyrogen (EP)
the mediator of fever, produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages.
exogenous pyrogen
lipopolysaccharides and other substances produced by pathogenic microorganisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MAT employing fresh or cryo-preserved human blood was described and validated as an in vitro pyrogen test [2,3].
The Pyrogen Test was designed to determine the presence of chemical pyrogens in extracts of solid materials in order to limit risks of febrile reaction in a patient.
A combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches were used to calculate market sizes and growth rates of the global pyrogen testing market and its sub segments.
The global Pyrogen Testing Market is segmented on the basis of applications, products, tests, and geographies.
Metal Storm's Chief Executive Officer Charles Vehlow said he was very pleased that the company's ongoing relationship with Pyrogen - an international fire protection company which distributes its products through a worldwide network of distributors and dealers - had progressed to this stage.
Both the LAL and IPT tests are designed to detect pyrogens, which are microbial contaminants such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that cause fever and illness in people.
Pyrogen Australia Pty Limited based in Sydney, Australia, is a subsidiary of Pyrogen Corporation, an international company marketing and distributing Pyrogen fire suppression products.
Endotoxins (inflammatory substances, or pyrogens, produced by the dead remnants of some Gram-negative bacteria) can be transferred from sterile gloves to instruments, IVs, catheters, sutures, implants, transplantation organs, grafts, etc.
Tender are invited for Purchase of Essential items to be used for research purpose -,2 ml Eppendorf tubes with flat caps clear and conical bottom, sterile, DNAse, RNAse pyrogen free One Pack of 1000 tubes 10 Pacs , Soft Laboratory Tissue Rolls One Pack of 20 Rolls 05 Packs , Aluminum Foil One Pack of 10 Rolls 03 Packs , Micro Centrifuge tube sterile 1.
Fevers are caused by chemicals called pyrogens flowing in the bloodstream.
In the vapor or steam phase, all other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic carbons (TOCs), particles, viruses, bacteria, pyrogens, and metals can be removed from the purified steam.
Fine particles in DI water include bacteria, yeast, suspended solids, virus, colloidal silica, pyrogens, enzymes, colloids and other charged particles.