pyrogen


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Related to pyrogen: endotoxin, endogenous pyrogen

pyrogen

 [pi´ro-jen]
an agent that causes fever; called also pyretic and pyrectic. adj., adj pyrogen´ic.
endogenous pyrogen a low-molecular-weight protein that is produced by phagocytic leukocytes in response to stimulation by exogenous pyrogens and released into the circulation; it induces fever by acting on the preoptic area of the hypothalamus to raise the set-point of the hypothalamic thermostat. The pyrogen produced by monocytes and macrophages is not identical to that produced by neutrophils and eosinophils; the mononuclear phagocytes also produce a greater amount of pyrogen for a longer period of time than do the polymorphonuclear cells.
exogenous p's fever-producing agents of external origin, e.g., bacterial endotoxins and other microbial products, antigen-antibody complexes, viruses and synthetic polynucleotides, incompatible blood and blood products, and androgen breakdown products such as etiocholanolone; the action is mediated by endogenous pyrogen.

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen),
A fever-inducing agent; pyrogens are produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

/py·ro·gen/ (pi´ro-jen) a fever-producing substance.

pyrogen

(pī′rə-jən)
n.
A substance that produces fever.

pyrogen

[pī′rəjən]
Etymology: Gk, pyr, fire, genein, to produce
any substance or agent that tends to cause a rise in body temperature, such as some bacterial toxins. See also fever. pyrogenic, adj.

pyrogen

 A fever-inducing substance

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
A fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts; commonly found in distilled water.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

Any substance that causes fever. Endogenous pyrogens are proteins, such as interleukin-1, released by white blood cells in response to bacterial or viral infections. These act on the temperature-regulating centre in the brain, effectively resetting the thermostat at a higher level and causing the muscles to contract repeatedly and rapidly (shivering) so as to raise body temperature.

pyrogen

any substance which alters the body thermostat of HOMOIOTHERMS to a higher setting, giving rise to fever.

Pyrogen

A chemical circulating in the blood that causes a rise in body temperature.
Mentioned in: Fever

py·ro·gen

(pī'rō-jen)
Fever-inducing agent; produced by bacteria, molds, viruses, and yeasts.
[pyro- + G. -gen, producing]

pyrogen

an agent that causes fever.

endogenous pyrogen (EP)
the mediator of fever, produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes and macrophages.
exogenous pyrogen
lipopolysaccharides and other substances produced by pathogenic microorganisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
This report segments the global pyrogen testing market is segmented based on applications, products, tests, and geographies.
Based on products, the pyrogen testing market is segmented into kits and reagents, services, and instruments.
The MAT employing fresh or cryo-preserved human blood was described and validated as an in vitro pyrogen test [2,3].
The pyrogen concentration in the sample is then determined from the IL-1B concentration via an endotoxin standard curve, and analyzed with the PyroDetect data analysis tool.
The Pyrogen Test was designed to determine the presence of chemical pyrogens in extracts of solid materials in order to limit risks of febrile reaction in a patient.
Metal Storm and Pyrogen intend to progressively target specific applications in the multi billion dollar fire fighting markets in Australia, Asia, USA and Europe to take advantage of Pyrogen's existing market base," he said.
If pyrogens are present in the test sample, the white blood cells in the blood respond by producing interleukin 1-beta, which is then measured by performing a standard ELISA assay.
For 1:800 titres autumnalis was more predominant serogroup followed by canicola and autumnalis was prevalent serogroup for 1:1600 MAT titre followed by pyrogens (Table 1 and Fig 4).
Technique Impurities most effectively removed Distillation inorganic ions, particles, bacteria, pyrogens Reverse osmosis particles, bacteria, pyrogens Deionization inorganic ions and dissolved gases Filtration particles and bacteria Ultrafiltration (UF) particles, bacteria, pyrogens Adsorption organics and chlorine Ultraviolet (UV) organics and bacteria oxidation Combination UV/UF organics, particles, bacteria, pyrogens and nucleases Table 1: Impurities removed by each technology
Three Treatment Options Reverse Distillation osmosis Deionization Dissolved inorganic solids 2 2 1 Dissolved inorganic gases 2 3 1 Dissolved organics 2 2 1 Particulates 1 1 3 Bacteria 1 1 3 Pyrogens 1 1 3 1 - excellent 2 - good 3 - poor
POD dispensers can be adapted with contaminant-specific final polishers to remove pyrogens, nucleases, bacteria, particulates and organics.
Fine particles in DI water include bacteria, yeast, suspended solids, virus, colloidal silica, pyrogens, enzymes, colloids and other charged particles.