pyridoxine


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pyridoxine

 [pir″ĭ-dok´sēn]
one of the forms of vitamin B6, used as the hydrochloride salt in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency. It is also used in counteracting the neurotoxic effects of isoniazid and as an antidote to cycloserine.

pyr·i·dox·ine

(pir'i-dok'sēn),
The original vitamin B6; term now includes pyridoxal and pyridoxamine, associated with the use of unsaturated fatty acids. In rats, deficiency produces a nutritional dermatitis and acrodynia; in humans, deficiency may result in increased irritability, convulsions, and peripheral neuritis. The hydrochloride is used in pharmaceutic preparations; found naturally in some vegetables.

pyridoxine

/pyr·i·dox·ine/ (pir″ĭ-dok´sēn) one of the forms of vitamin B6, used as the hydrochloride salt in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency and as an antidote in cycloserine and isoniazid poisoning.

pyridoxine

(pĭr′ĭ-dŏk′sēn, -sĭn) also

pyridoxin

(-dŏk′sĭn)
n.
A pyridine derivative, C8H11NO3, that is one of several forms of vitamin B6 and is the form typically found in vitamin supplements and enriched foods.

pyridoxine

[pir′ədok′sēn]
a water-soluble white crystalline vitamin that is part of the B complex. It is derived from pyridine and converted in the body to pyridoxal and pyridoxamine for synthesis. It functions as a coenzyme essential for the synthesis and breakdown of amino acids, the conversion of tryptophan to niacin, the breakdown of glycogen to glucose 1-phosphate, the production of antibodies, the formation of heme in hemoglobin, the formation of hormones important in brain function, the proper absorption of vitamin B12, the production of hydrochloric acid and magnesium, and the maintenance of the balance of sodium and potassium, which regulates body fluids and the functioning of the nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Rich dietary sources are meats, especially organ meats; whole-grain cereals; soybeans; peanuts; wheat germ; and brewer's yeast. Milk and green vegetables supply smaller amounts. The most common symptoms of deficiency are seborrheic dermatitis about the eyes, nose, and mouth and behind the ears; cheilosis; glossitis and stomatitis; nervousness; depression; peripheral neuropathy; and lymphopenia, leading to convulsions in infants and anemia in adults. Treatment and prophylaxis consist of administration of the vitamin and a diet rich in foods containing it. Several drugs interfere with the use of pyridoxine, notably isoniazid and penicillamine, and supplements of the vitamin are recommended with the use of these drugs. The need for increased amounts of pyridoxine is related to protein intake and occurs during pregnancy, lactation, exposure to radiation, cardiac failure, aging, and use of oral contraceptives. Also called pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin B6.

pyridoxine

Nutrition A form of vitamin B6 used with INH for TB to prevent peripheral neuropathy. See Vitamin B6.

pyr·i·dox·ine

(pir'i-dok'sēn)
The original vitamin B6; a term that now includes pyridoxal and pyridoxamine; necessary for various functions including amino acid metabolism and synthesis of heme, histamine, and dopamine. Deficiency may result in increased irritability, convulsions, and peripheral neuritis. The hydrochloride is used in pharmaceutical preparations; the chief form in plant matter.

pyridoxine

One of the B6 group of vitamins. The drug is on the WHO official list.

pyridoxine (B6 )

a water-soluble vitamin of the B-COMPLEX found in fresh meat, eggs, liver, fresh vegetables and whole grains. The vitamin acts as a coenzyme in AMINO ACID metabolism from carbohydrates, a deficiency of which causes dermatitis and, sometimes, motor impairment.

pyridoxine,

n See vitamin B6.

pyridoxine

one of the forms of vitamin B6, chiefly used, as the hydrochloride salt, in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency. Nutritional deficiency is not known to occur under natural conditions in animals. Called also pyridoxal, adermin.
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6] of basal diets mainly came from wheat and isolated soybean protein (Table 1) and the calculated pyridoxine in basal diets was 1.
Pyridoxine is required for post-embryonic root development and tolerance to osmotic and oxidative stresses.
The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of dietary pyridoxine on survival, growth, tissue pyridoxine concentration, and aminotransferases activity of juvenile abalone, H.
1] as urea in the main plots and three pre-sowing seed treatments with pyridoxine included 0 (control), 100 and 200 mg [l.
About Diclegis Diclegis (doxylamine succinate 10 mg, pyridoxine hydrochloride 10 mg) delayed-release tablets is the only FDA-approved prescription treatment for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) in women who do not respond to conservative management.
Currently, trials are being conducted in the United States in a process aimed at reintroducing the combination of doxylamine and pyridoxine to the U.
The purpose of the present study was to examine if a commercially available nutraceutical supplement that may be neuroprotective and contains phosphatidylserine, Ginkgo biloba, vitamin E, and pyridoxine could improve cognitive function in aged beagles.
The ingredient list in Diet Coke Plus includes the following added vitamins and minerals: magnesium sulfate (declared at 10% of the Daily Value for magnesium in the Nutrition Facts panel), zinc gluconate (declared at 10% of the DV for zinc), niacinamide (declared at 15% of the DV for niacin), pyridoxine hydrochloride (declared at 15% of the DV for vitamin B6), and cyanocobalamine (declared at 15% of the DV for vitamin B12).
Contract awarded for cianocabalamina, pyridoxine hydrochloride, declofenaco sodium thiamine mononitrate extended-release tablets 1 mg / 100mg / 100mg / 100mg
doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) Delayed-Release Tablets, for the treatment of Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy (NVP) in women who do not respond to conservative management,[1] are now available without prior authorization through the Connecticut state-administered Medicaid program.
7 g of vitamin C, 600 mg of magnesium chloride hexahydrate, 1000 mcg of hydroxocobalamin, 100 mg of pyridoxine, 250 mg of pantothenic acid (as dexpanthenol), and 1 ml of B complex 100 provided rapid relief of symptoms.
Bendectin consisted of 10 mg of pyridoxine (vitamin [B.