pyrexia


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Related to pyrexia: Pyrexia of unknown origin

pyrexia

 [pi-rek´se-ah]
fever. adj., adj pyrex´ial.

fe·ver

(fē'vĕr),
A complex physiologic response to disease mediated by pyrogenic cytokines and characterized by a rise in core temperature, generation of acute phase reactants, and activation of immune systems.
Synonym(s): febris, pyrexia
[A.S. fefer]

fe·ver

pyrexiophobia.

pyrexia

/py·rex·ia/ (pi-rek´se-ah) pl. pyrex´iae   fever.pyrex´ial

pyrexia

(pī-rĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Fever.

py·rex′i·al, py·rex′ic adj.

pyrexia

See fever.

fe·ver

(fē'vĕr)
A complex physiologic response to disease mediated by pyrogenic cytokines and characterized by a significant rise in core temperature, generation of acute phase reactants, and activation of immunologic systems.
Synonym(s): pyrexia.
[A.S. fefer]

pyrexia

Fever.

Pyrexia

A medical term denoting fevers.

pyrexia

fever, i.e. increased core body temperature (i.e. >37°C)

fe·ver

(fē'vĕr)
A complex physiologic response to disease mediated by pyrogenic cytokines and characterized by a rise in core temperature, generation of acute phase reactants, and activation of immune systems.
Synonym(s): pyrexia.
[A.S. fefer]

pyrexia (pīrek´sēə),

n See fever.

pyrexia

a fever, or febrile condition. Can be said to be present if body temperature exceeds the normal range for the particular age and species: horse 102.0°F (39.0°C), cattle 103.0°F (39.5°C), pig 103.5°F (40.0°C), sheep 104.0°F (40.0°C), goat 105.0°F (40.5°C), dog and cat 102.0°F (39.0°C). Called also fever. See also hyperthermia.

pyrexia-pruritus-hemorrhage syndrome
a syndrome in dairy cattle thought to be due to use of a chemical aid in the making of ensilage, possibly via the intervention of a mycotoxin. Clinically characterized by widespread pruritic dermatitis, fever and mucosal petechiation.

Patient discussion about pyrexia

Q. High Fever - is it dangerous? high fever over a long period can be dangerous. on the other hand it shows also that your body is working like Superman...

A. the heart surgeon knows, that if he touchs during a heart-operation this sparkle of 96°C, the patient will die. exitus for sure! the problem for the heart surgeon is, that he don't know why it is so. this is the big problem you can have with a doctor who don't know about such things. if you like to know more about this sparkle and why the patient dies, write me a mail and i will share with you a link to read about it. ask me if you don't understand me for what i try to teach you. FEVER is a healing-system nature gave us. Let it work naturally. don't make a tonsillectomy just because some do or because it is a fashion. think first about it. your tonsils have functions and we need them. they are not just decoration. my parents forced me to make a tonsillectomy because they were told to do so because i had many otitis. i would never do it to my kids. i have since 30 years from time to time pain there and i loose some blood. it hurts terribly when it is acute.

Q. What Causes Cough With Fever? Often during winter I become sick with fever and on going cough. What causes it?

A. Cough with fever can be a first sign to many respiratory tract infections with viruses or bacterias, starting from simple ones as the common cold (or "flu") up to more serious conditions such as pneumonia, that requires medical care and medications.

Q. What Treats Cough With Fever? I have the flu and so my entire body hurts, and I can't stop coughing. What type of medications can I buy over-the-counter to help me feel better?

A. Simple analgesics are good for lowering fever and easing pain. As for the cough, there is a question whether or not cough suppressants are actually recommended. http://www.5min.com/Video/Do-Cough-Syrups-Work-5602143

More discussions about pyrexia
References in periodicals archive ?
Closely monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serious events such as pyrexia, headache, nausea, asthenia, hypotension, increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST), increased total bilirubin (TBILI), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), capillary leak syndrome (CLS), and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis/macrophage activation syndrome (HLH/MAS).
Leading causes of classic pyrexia of unknown origin Infection Neoplasms Tuberculosis Lymphoma Occult bacterial abscess Renal carcinoma Endocarditis Atrial myxoma Brucellosis Infection Connective tissue Tuberculosis Still's disease Occult bacterial abscess Variants of rheumatoid arthritis Endocarditis Systemic lupus erythematosus Brucellosis Temporal arteritis Polymyalgia rheumatica Infection Other (geographical) Tuberculosis Familial Mediterranean fever Occult bacterial abscess Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease Endocarditis Melioidosis Brucellosis Pyrexia of unknown origin defined as temperature >38.
The percent effect of PA in yeast induced pyrexia test at various doses is demonstrated in Fig.
Secondly: in our experience, the most common cause by far of abdominal lymphadenopathy in HIV-infected patients with pyrexia is tuberculous lymphadenitis.
In the integrated analysis, the most commonly reported adverse events were asthenic conditions (including fatigue, malaise, and weakness) (64%), nausea (55%), diarrhea (52%), constipation (41%), peripheral neuropathy NEC (including peripheral sensory neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy aggravated) (39%), thrombocytopenia and appetite decreased (including anorexia) (each 36%), pyrexia (34%), vomiting (33%), and anemia (29%).
Infection was defined as cases of confirmed diagnosis of infection and also those treated with antibiotics for any reason, including presumptive infection based on the presence of prolonged bleeding, abdominal pain, offensive discharge and/or pyrexia.
Exposure to isolated fever was defined as maternal intrapartum fever of 38[degrees] C or greater, or ICD-9 diagnosis of maternal intrapartum pyrexia without chorioamnionitis.
In Xeloda monotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, the most common adverse events were anemia (80%), diarrhea (55%), hand-foot syndrome (54%), hyperbilirubinemia (48%), nausea (43%), fatigue/weakness (42%), abdominal pain (35%), dermatitis (27%), vomiting (27%), appetite decreased (26%), stomatitis (25%), pyrexia (18%), edema (15%), constipation (14%), dyspnea (14%), neutropenia (13%), pain (12%), back pain (10%), and headache (10%).
3 mg/m(2)/dose in phase II studies, the most commonly reported adverse events were asthenic conditions (65 percent), nausea (64 percent), diarrhea (51 percent), decreased appetite including anorexia (43 percent), constipation (43 percent), thrombocytopenia (43 percent), peripheral neuropathy (37 percent), pyrexia (36 percent), vomiting (36 percent), and anemia (32 percent).
24) Likewise, acetaminophen or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug might be necessary to treat pyrexia and/or lymphadenopathic pain.
The most common adverse reactions observed in clinical trials (frequency 10 percent of subjects) were pyrexia, headache, cough, nasopharyngitis, vomiting, arthralgia, and limb injury.