pyramidal tract signs

pyramidal tract signs

Signs of damage to a PYRAMIDAL TRACT as may occur in STROKE. They include weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, increased tension in the affected muscles (SPASTICITY), increased tendon reflex jerks and a BABINSKI reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) In classic PKAN the symptoms usually start to appear before age 6 on average around age 3 with profound dystonia, dysarthria, spasticity and pyramidal tract signs and pigmentary retinopathy leading to night blindness and visual field constriction.
The most consistent clinical syndrome in MSA is the presence of Parkinsonism, followed by autonomic dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal tract signs.
steppage gait, radicular/peripheral Trendelenburg sign) sensory deficit Spastic Non-fluent gait, Elevated muscle tone, circumduction of the legs, brisk reflexes, stiffness, scissors gait, pyramidal tract signs forward rotation of the (Babinski), urge lateral edge of the foot incontinence Ataxic Broad-based, Cerebellar: other uncoordinated, variable; cerebellar signs (limb worsens when the eyes are dysmetria, oculo-motor closed disturbances, (proprioceptive-deficit dysarthria); ataxia) Proprioceptive-deficit ataxia: demonstrable proprioceptive deficit Sensory deficit Broad-based, variable, BVP: oscillopsia, diminished swing phase, pathological worsens when another head-impulse test; PNP: system is impaired (e.