putrescence


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putrescence

 [pu-tres´ens]
the condition of undergoing putrefaction. adj., adj putres´cent.

pu·tres·cence

(pyū-tres'ĕnts),
The state of putrefaction.

putrescence

/pu·tres·cence/ (pu-tres´ens) the condition of undergoing putrefaction.putres´cent

putrescence

(pyo͞o-trĕs′əns)
n.
1. A putrescent character or condition.
2. Putrid matter.

pu·tres·cence

(pyū-tres'ĕns)
The state of putrefaction.

putrescence

the condition of undergoing putrefaction.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The vultures gorged themselves at the tortoise, he said, then went to drink at the waterhole and shat such a putrescence that the cows wouldn't go near enough to drink.
Entrapped, ensnared within the labyrinthine conforms of her own disarticulations; narcissistically, self-laceratingly iterating the disintegrative mechanisms that are her cast, the protagonist is at once an intimate, inveterate center of textuality, the object of the putrescence she poeticizes; and still, a distanced by-stander of sorts, extradited to the margins and commenting therefrom upon the matter she observes.
Among his English friends, the art of Ingres was held in high esteem, while the work of the realists Courbet and Edouard Manet was lumped together indiscriminately and considered, in Dante Gabriel Rossetti's words, "Simple putrescence.
Like these blossoms, bright sores burst upon earth's ignorant flesh, at first sight everything is innocence--then it's itch, scratch, putrescence.
But here the classic profiles of water- and calla-lilies, decaying roots and all, are made eerily fragile and translucent: the organic is frozen into delicate, calligraphic messages of a sublimity that always threatens to slip into the horrible, into rot and putrescence.
To his mother he was more concise: "The new French school is simple putrescence and decomposition" (November 12).
But when found in the Public Forum they are not just ink smears all over the page but are unadulterated putrescence.
A city that by the 1850s drained 260 tons of sewage into the river each day was alarmed to find waste piling up on exposed mud banks in ribbons of black putrescence.