putrefaction


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Related to putrefaction: intestinal putrefaction

putrefaction

 [pu″trĕ-fak´shun]
enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and mercaptans. adj., adj putrefac´tive.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn),
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction

/pu·tre·fac·tion/ (pu″trĕ-fak´shun) enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, and mercaptans.putrefac´tive

putrefaction

(pyo͞o′trə-făk′shən)
n.
1. Decomposition of organic matter, especially protein, by microorganisms, resulting in production of foul-smelling matter.
2. An amount of putrefied matter or an odor produced by such matter.

putrefaction

[pyo̅o̅′trəfak′shən]
Etymology: L, puter, rotten, facere, to make
the decay of enzymes, especially proteins, that produces foul-smelling compounds, such as ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and mercaptans. putrefactive, adj.

infanticide

Forensic medicine The active or semi-passive killing of a viable conceptus > 20 gestational wks, which breathes spontaneously. See Battered child syndrome, Child abuse. Cf Stillbirth.
Infanticide, diagnosis of  
'Hard' criteria
•  Comparison of gastric fluid composition with that of a toilet bowel-active drowning
•  Peural surfaces with petechiae Seen in induced suffocation, most significant when coupled with hematomas and petechiae on the mouth and epiglottis; the lingual frenulum may be torn and the lips bruised, indicating active attempts to suffocate infant.
•  Lungs Stillbirth lungs are not aerated and do not float
•  Edematous foam on nostrils An indicator of active breathing
•  Meconium Resuscitation of a true stillborn may push meconium into the perianal region, but extensive staining of the placenta and umbilical cord is due to antenatal stress
'Soft' criteria
•  Denial of pregnancy If the woman is obese or a dullard, she may not know she was pregnant
•  Rigor mortis A finding that is poorly appreciated in neonates
•  Impression of the body in soil, blood, or fomites, requiring diligent and timely scene investigation
•  Maceration of skin A finding typical of stillbirth
•  Putrefaction Stillborns do not putrefy as they have sterile bowels
•  Umbilical cord A cut cord indicates active intervention-time undetermined; an intact cord is consistent with stillbirth
•  Determination of age Viability, most fetuses born before 18 wks of gestation die despite resuscitative efforts, age is determined by skeletal dating, antenatal studies corroborating fetal death, eg Spaulding sign of in utero death characterized by overlapping cranial bones  

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter, usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition.
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction

the decomposition of proteins, which gives rise to foul-smelling products.

putrefaction (pyōōˈ·tr·fakˑ·shn),

n the decomposition of protein compounds.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in formation of other substances of less complex constitution with evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (3) .
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

putrefaction (pū´trəfak´shən),

n the rotting of matter through the use of enzymes, producing substances such as ammonia, mercaptans, and hydrogen sulfide.

putrefaction

enzymatic decomposition, especially of proteins, with the production of foul-smelling compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, ammonia and mercaptans. Called also decomposition.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, as Winfried Menninghaus notes, Rosenkranz's description of putrefaction is also reminiscent of the definition of the beautiful: "Lessing and others characterized aesthetic illusion by a deceptive aliveness; on the other hand, 'the appearance of life' is now meant to constitute 'the infinitely revolting within the disgusting'" (132).
What unites all three books, and other works on the culture of death in the Caribbean is the quest for meaning, for a demonstration that something useful came out of the putrefaction and despair that early modern peoples felt was emblematic of living in countries where bodily survival was especially insecure.
Consequently, the formation of similar amounts of putrefaction gas can be expected during decomposition.
The autopsy report says Hemraj's body was in an advanced state of putrefaction.
Only a third of the marinated meat was fresh, more than a half showed signs of putrefaction and around 15% was putrefied.
The current stalemate is another headline for the putrefaction of the current situation and the decay of the breaks preventing its transformation into a security and field collapse.
While out on a drive in snow near Highgate, he impulsively decided to buy a hen, had it eviscerated and stuffed it with snow to discover if freezing would delay the process of putrefaction.
But then, what really makes Wells's novel stick is that amazing ending in which Earth is not saved by mankind but by the bacteria that causes putrefaction and for which the Martians have no resistance.
Morris was always prompted by a sense of moral outrage (and not necessarily to agreeable effect--think of the Romantic, John Martin-like vistas of hurricane, pestilence, holocaust, and putrefaction typical of his work from the early '80s; too message-y for sure but unflinchingly sincere).
Of particular interest to Gothic Studies scholars, this theme provides the title of the first chapter, "Problems of Disposal," which ranges over a large number of works, including "The Assignation," "Ligeia," "Berenice," "Morella," "Bon-Bon," and "King Pest," linking them through the trope of contagion and the putrefaction of diseased bodies.
Huysmans's narratives that focus on women's bodies and beds show that physical abjection, the putrefaction of substances are threshhold events signalling a spiritual and artistic rebirth.
He searched for three words: "gnicie" meaning decayed, putrefaction or rot; "rozpad-gnilny" (decay or putrefaction) and "saprofity", referring to creatures that eat dead organisms.