putamen

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putamen

 [pu-ta´men]
the larger, darker, and more lateral part of the lentiform nucleus, separated from the lateral globus pallidus by the lateral medullary lamina.

pu·ta·men

(pū-tā'men), [TA]
The outer, larger, and darker gray of the three portions into which the lenticular nucleus is divided by laminae of white fibers; it is connected with the caudate nucleus by bridging bands of gray substance that penetrate the internal capsule. Its histologic structure is similar to that of the caudate nucleus together with which it composes the striatum.
See also: striate body, lenticular nucleus.
[L. that which falls off in pruning, fr. puto, to prune]

putamen

/pu·ta·men/ (pu-ta´men) the larger and more lateral part of the lentiform nucleus.

putamen

(pyo͞o-tā′mən)
n. pl. pu·tamina (-tăm′ə-nə)
1. The hard endocarp of certain fruits; pyrene.
2. The reddish, outermost, and largest of the three portions into which the lentiform nucleus of the brain is divided.

putamen

[pyo̅o̅tā′mən]
Etymology: L, putamen, husk
a part of the lentiform nucleus that is lateral to the globus pallidus. It is associated with the corpus striatum and receives connections from the suppressor centers of the cortex.

pu·ta·men

(pyū-tā'men) [TA]
The outer, larger, and darker gray of the three portions into which the lenticular nucleus is divided by laminae of white fibers; it is connected with the caudate nucleus by bridging bands of gray substance that penetrate the internal capsule. Its histologic structure is similar to that of the caudate nucleus; together they compose the striatum.
See also: striate body
[L. that which falls off in pruning, fr. puto, to prune]

putamen

The outer shell of the lentiform nucleus of the BASAL GANGLIA of the brain.

basal ganglia

central nervous system ganglia (i.e. caudate nucleus and putamen [i.e. the striatum], lentiform nucleus and substantia nigra) that control and coordinate fine movement; their output inhibits movement (other than postural reflexes) when at rest, and assists movement initiation by inhibiting postural reflexes

putamen

the larger and more lateral part of the lenticular nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our experience of transsylvian-transinsular microsurgical approach to hypertensive putaminal hematomas.
Dillon, "Unilateral putaminal CT, MR, and diffusion abnormalities secondary to nonketotic hyperglycemia in the setting of acute neurologic symptoms mimicking stroke," American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol.
Methanol poisoning: bilateral putaminal and cerebellar cortical lesions on CT and MR.
Computed tomography-guided aspiration versus key-hole craniotomy for spontaneous putaminal haemorrhage: a prospective comparison of minimally invasive procedures.
a pattern of bilateral and symmetric striatal loss without evidence of predominant or asymmetric putaminal denervation that would indicate PD.
In animal models putaminal dopamine levels have been shown to correlate strongly with the degree of akinesia present, as is also the case for human cases of MPTP intoxication investigated by [.
The CT and MR imaging in that patient showed bilateral putaminal haemorrhagic necrosis and subcortical white matter lesions.
Ventricular extension usually seen with Caudate, thalamic, large putaminal and large lobar hemorrhages.
BATJER HH, REISCH JS, ALLEN BC, PLAIZIER LJ, SU CJ: Failure of surgery to improve outcome in hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage.
47] These findings show that well-developed grafts of dopamine-rich embryonic mesencephalic tissue can normalize putaminal dopamine storage and release, and give rise to major symptomatic relief for at least up to a decade after surgery, despite an ongoing disease process with continuous cell loss within the patient's own dopaminergic system.
The only study of allaesthesia after stroke was confined to patients with thalamic or putaminal haemorrhage, none of whom had neglect |32~.
sup][4] Another feature of this case was that the neuroimaging showed predominant basal ganglia involvement with putaminal and caudate atrophy, which could explain the extrapyramidal manifestations such as dystonia and dysphasia.