pus


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pus

 [pus]
a protein-rich liquid inflammation product made up of leukocytes, cellular debris, and a thin fluid called liquor puris.
blue pus pus with a bluish tint, seen in certain suppurative infections, the color occurring as a result of the presence of an antibiotic pigment (pyocyanin) produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

pus

(pŭs),
A fluid product of inflammation, consisting of a liquid containing leukocytes and the debris of dead cells and tissue elements liquefied by the proteolytic and histolytic enzymes (for example, leukoprotease) that are elaborated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
[L.]

pus

(pus) a protein-rich liquid inflammation product made up of leukocytes, cellular debris, and a thin fluid (liquor puris).

pus

(pŭs)
n.
A generally viscous, yellowish-white fluid formed in infected tissue, consisting of white blood cells, cellular debris, and necrotic tissue.

pus

Etymology: L, corrupt matter
a creamy, viscous fluid exudate that is the result of fluid remains of necrosis of tissues. It is usually pale yellow to yellow green, sometimes whitish, and sometimes bloody. Its main constituent is an abundance of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Bacterial infection is its most common cause. The character of the pus, including its color, consistency, quantity, or odor, may be of diagnostic significance.

pus

(pŭs)
A fluid product of inflammation containing leukocytes and the debris of dead cells and tissue elements.
[L.]

pus

A yellowish or green viscous fluid consisting of dead white blood cells, bacteria, partly destroyed tissue and protein. Pus is formed at the site of bacterial infection but may occur in sterile situations as a result of inflammation from other causes.

pus

a yellowish fluid consisting of serum, white blood cells, bacteria and tissue debris formed during the liquefaction of inflamed tissue (suppuration).

Pus

A thick yellowish or greenish fluid composed of the remains of dead white blood cells, pathogens and decomposed cellular debris.

pus

liquefied dead/defunct leukocytes, microorganisms, plasma proteins and tissue elements denoting infection; varying in colour (from creamy-white, through buff, green and brown, to blood-stained), texture (from watery to thick), amount (depending on extent of infection, and degree of focus/'pointing'), and smell; collected as a sample ('swab') for pathology laboratory identification of causative organism/s and their sensitivity to antibacterial drugs

pus

(pŭs)
Fluid product of inflammation, consisting of liquid containing leukocytes and debris of dead cells and tissue elements liquefied by proteolytic and histolytic enzymes (e.g., leukoprotease) that are elaborated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
[L.]

pus (pus),

n an inflammatory exudate formed within the tissues consisting of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, necrotic tissues, microorganisms, and tissue fluids. It may form within the tissues in periodontal disease and escape via the ulcerated pocket epithelium into the oral cavity. The material may be retained within the tissues when the opening of the periodontal pocket is blocked, thus creating a favorable circumstance for the formation of a periodontal abscess. It may also be involved in apical infections. Other term:
purulent discharge. More current term:
suppuration.

pus

a protein-rich liquid inflammation product made up of cells (leukocytes), a thin fluid (liquor puris) and cellular debris.

blue pus
pus with a bluish tint, seen in certain suppurative infections, the color occurring as a result of the presence of an antibiotic pigment (pyocyanin) produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
pus in milk
indicates complete destruction of the mammary secretory tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decrease of cold crystallization peak with the increase of end group content was related to the hindrance of molecular interactions between PUs by the grafted end groups, which could improve the PU chain mobility and the low temperature toughness of PU chains in the following section depending on the structures of end groups.
He further submitted that the PU senate comprised nominated and elected members but the university did not hold any elections for the directly elected senate members.
Because the scope of the article is to review primary prevention of incident PUs and secondary prevention of recurrence, studies addressing treatment of PUs only (e.
We pooled together the results from thermosetting and thermoplastic PUs, and analyzed them together, so that the conclusions from our study could be more general.
The blood culture, after 5 days of incubation, also grew a similar organism with the entire set of characteristics identical with the growth from pus.
com" published a list of the average pus content for milk from each of the United States.
We studied segmented PUs whose soft segments were formed by PCL diols, but hard segments from PLA triols and HDI or 4,4'-methylene bis(cyclohexyl) diisocyanate ([H.
9) In our experience, the cautious use of a 14-gauge needle rather than a smaller-gauge needle increases the likelihood of obtaining pus from a peritonsillar abscess.
A post-mortem examination showed the pus coming out of the ear was not a contributory factor to his death.
But this is rare as pus in the middle ear can drain out easily through a hole in the eardrum or into the mastoid part of the temporal bone.
The initiative seeks to enlist the use of cam pus housing, food services, communication centers, medical facilities, and counseling services during a crisis.