purpuric


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pur·pu·ric

(pŭr-pū'rik),
Relating to or affected with purpura.

purpuric

See purpura.

purpuric

adjective Referring to purpura, see there.

purpuric

adjective Referring to purpura, see there.

pur·pu·ric

(pŭr-pyŭr'ik)
Relating to or affected with purpura.
References in periodicals archive ?
4],[6],[11],[12],[13],[14],[15] Purpuric eruptions was the most common form, followed by urticaria, Raynaud's phenomenon, and angular stomatitis.
Keywords: Pigmented purpuric dermatosis, thrombocyte, mean platelet volume
Diagnostic criteria for Mediterranean spotted fever caused by Rickettsia conorii [11] Criteria Score Epidemiological Stay in endemic area 2 Occurrence in May-October 2 Contact (certain or possible) 2 with dog ticks Clinical Fever > 39[degrees]C 5 Eschar 5 Maculopapular or purpuric rash 5 Two of the above criteria 3 All three of the above criteria 5 Laboratory Platelets < 150 G/L 1 SGOT or SGPT > 50 U/L 1 Bacteriological Blood culture positive for 25 Rickettsia conorii Detection of Rickettsia conorii in 25 a skin biopsy Serological Single serum and IgG > 1/128 5 Single serum and IgG > 1/128 and 10 IgM > 1/64 Fourfold increase in two sera obtained 20 within a 2-week interval Table 2.
Patients will typically present with a painful, purpuric rash in a retiform or stellate pattern with or without central necrosis involving the extremities, trunk, nasal tip, digits, cheeks, and/or ears.
31 year old Hispanic female who presented to the emergency room with a 15 day onset of a lesion in her right gluteus, ulcerated, painful, purpuric, measuring 3 x 4 centimeters approximately, and another one in the proximal right thigh, also purpuric, painful, non-ulcerated and with irregular edges (Photo 3).
identified a new strain of mycobacterium (Mycobacterium lepromatosis) in two Mexican patients who presented with DLL, purpuric and ulcerative skin lesions due probably to LPh, and who subsequently died.
Infectious diseases featuring fever and rash that require emergency diagnosis and treatment include fever with rashes that are purpuric, petechial, or erythrodermic, Dr.
Here, we present a type 2 diabetic patient who had purpuric skin lesions predominantly on the lower limbs and acute renal failure overriding to underlying chronic kidney disease due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with radiocontrast administration.
The skin examinations revealed a small purpuric lesion on the tip of the tongue and diffuse petechiae predominantly on the lower extremities, but also on the torso and upper extremities.
Common clinical manifestations include a purpuric rash, abdominal pain, arthralgia/arthritis and renal disease.
Crops of palpable, non-blanching, purpuric rash were distributed over the extensor surfaces of the lower extremities and buttocks.