purposeful activity


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activity

 [ak-tiv´ĭ-te]
1. the quality or process of exerting energy or of accomplishing an effect.
2. a thermodynamic quantity that represents the effective concentration of a solute in a non-ideal solution. Symbol a.
3. the number of disintegrations per unit of a radioactive material. Symbol A.
4. the presence of recordable electrical energy in a nerve or muscle.
a's of daily living (ADL) activities that are necessary for daily care of oneself and independent community living. It includes using the toilet and grooming, dressing, and feeding oneself; independent community living includes driving, shopping, homemaking, care of family, work activities, and so on. See also self care, self care deficit, and self care assistance.(See accompanying table.)
deficient diversional activity a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the experiencing by an individual of decreased stimulation from, interest in, or engagement in recreational or leisure activities. Formerly called diversional activity deficit. Possible causes include prolonged hospitalization or immobility at home, frequent and lengthy treatments such as renal dialysis, and a monotonous, nonstimulating environment. The patient usually gives subjective evidence that this condition exists by verbalizing a feeling of boredom or stating a desire for something to do or gives objective evidence by acting depressed or restless.

Nursing interventions that could be appropriate for diversional activity deficit include interviewing the patient to assess the current situation and to assist in developing plans for activities that provide interest and stimulation. These activities could include music, games, reading, handwork, or any other pastimes enjoyed by the patient. Patients may need assistance in identifying available resources and motivation to take advantage of the activities they provide.
enzyme activity the catalytic effect exerted by an enzyme, expressed as units per milligram of enzyme (specific activity) or molecules of substrate transformed per minute per molecule of enzyme (molecular activity).
malignant ventricular ectopic activity ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia with syncope, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, or hypotension.
optical activity the ability of a chemical compound to rotate the plane of polarization of plane-polarized light.
physical activity bodily movements, such as those accompanying activities of daily living.
pulseless electrical activity (PEA) continued electrical rhythmicity of the heart in the absence of effective mechanical function; it may be due to uncoupling of ventricular muscle contraction from electrical activity or may be secondary to cardiac damage with respiratory failure and cessation of cardiac venous return. Called also electromechanical dissociation.
purposeful activity in occupational therapy, tasks or experiences in which the individual actively participates that require and elicit coordination between the sensory, motor, cognitive, and psychological systems. Each person has a unique set of purposeful activities, influenced by his or her life roles, and, when doing one of them, directs attention to the task itself rather than to the internal processes involved. Activities may yield immediate results or may require sustained effort and repetition, and they may either represent new responses or be part of complex, longstanding patterns of behavior.
sustained rhythmic activity the continuous generation of action potentials within the heart in the absence of artificial or external stimulation.
triggered activity activity in which nondriven action potentials arise from afterpotentials that were caused by the previous action potential.

purposeful activity

[pur′pəsfoo͡l]
activity that depends on consciously planned and directed involvement of the person. It is believed that conscious involvement in body movements enhances the development of sensorimotor control and coordination during therapeutic or rehabilitative exercises.

purposeful activity

The goal-directed use of time, energy, or attention that involves a person's active participation. Purposeful activity often involves a social environment (others), a physical environment (objects, tools, and materials), and a process, which often results in a product.
See also: activity
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the next five years, the prison has pledged to increase purposeful activity to 30 hours per week and increase education provision by a further 67 places.
Alison Williams, communications manager at Parc Prison, said: ``We're pleased to have exceeded Prison Service targets for the delivery of purposeful activity hours and mandatory drug testing positives at a time when our overall population has significantly increased.
Behind the scenes there is a flurry of purposeful activity.
It has improved and some of the developments and new services it has in progress, in resettlement and purposeful activity for instance, are very promising.
Parkhurst badly needs regional and national support to ensure the restoration of basic levels of safety and decency, together with investment to increase purposeful activity.
Ms Owers said, "Staff at Ranby deserve credit for managing a massive expansion programme and for ensuring prisoners continued to be generally well-treated and provided with purposeful activity.
The report from the Home Office inspection in July said improvements had been found in all our four key areas at Birmingham - safety, respect, purposeful activity and resettlement.
If prisoners are not getting attention or purposeful activity they are not being prepared properly for the outside world.
Chief Inspector of Prisons Anne Owers said: "Our four tests of a healthy prison are safety, respect, purposeful activity and assistance in resettlement.
The inspection found that outcomes for women were good or reasonably good against each of HMI Prisons' four main tests - safety, respect, purposeful activity and resettlement - though there was room for improvement in each of the areas.
As well not meeting accepted safety standards, the Criminal Justice Inspection Northern Ireland said the prison also failed to pass the other three internationally-recognised tests for inmate welfare - respect, purposeful activity and resettlement.
An HM Chief Inspector of Prisons report found that HMP & YOI Parc in Bridgend, was unable to meet the inspectorate's tests of safety, respect and purposeful activity.