purines


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purines

A group of nitrogen-containing compounds that includes adenine and guanine, the bases whose sequence forms the genetic code. An excess of purines can cause GOUT.
References in periodicals archive ?
0 g/kg of the total excreted purine derivatives and a very significant percentage was considered for the quantification of TP and absorbed purines (Table 4).
Adapting your diet and lifestyle, to minimise your purine intake, will often be enough to prevent further attacks of gout: * Cut out red meat and seafood from your diet.
The purines (except 2-deoxyadenosine), orotic acid, pseudouridine, uridine, 2-deoxyuridine, 5-hydroxymethyluracil, and thymidine were ionized in negative ionization mode.
In all UA-containing calculi, we found 9 other purines in addition to UA: Xan; Hyp; 2,8-DHA;1-, 3-, and 7-MUA; 1,3-DMU; and 3-and 7-MX (Table 1 and Fig.
Purine and pyrimidine species were first measured a century ago [see Ref.
These laboratories all used standard HPLC techniques (reversed-phase column, quantification by reading the absorbance at 260 nm) for measurement of purines and pyrimidines in body fluids.
High purine diet (red meat, poultry, offal, seafood, pulses, soya, yeast).
Certain foods and beverages contain compounds called purines that break down in the body to form the uric acid that causes gout.
Dr Choi said a likely non-alcoholic factor was the level of purines - a chemical which breaks down into uric acid - found in drink and food.