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pure

(pyūr),
Unadulterated; free from admixture or contamination with any extraneous matter.
[L. purus]

pure

(pūr) free from mixture with or contamination by other materials.

pure

[pyo̅o̅r]
1 free of contamination by extraneous matter.
2 a state in which a substance contains nothing other than itself.

pure

Drug slang
noun A regional term for uncut heroin

pure

(pyūr)
Unadulterated; free from admixture or contamination with any extraneous matter.
[L. purus]
References in classic literature ?
The tales, therefore, though less purely Oriental than in their first concoction, were eminently better fitted for the European market, and obtained an unrivalled degree of public favour, which they certainly would never have gained had not the manners and style been in some degree familiarized to the feelings and habits of the western reader.
Other poets have it, some more, some less, with the exception of those who belong to the purely Taoist school.
Industrious, and possessed of a handwriting purely English, his caligraphy is, it must be confessed, even worse than my own.
He pressed her hand to his heart before he replied-- "My health will never return; I am lost to this world; and in fact at this moment I properly belong to another in my body: would to God that I was purely so in feelings also.
It was nothing uncontrollable, it was but a tender longing of a most respectful and purely sentimental kind.
What though that light, thro' storm and night, So trembled from afar- What could there be more purely bright In Truths day-star ?
From this day she forced herself to take pains to avoid him--never allowing herself, as formerly, to remain long in his company, even if their juxtaposition were purely accidental.
They will also raise commotions concerning the degree in which they would have the established power; as if, for instance, the government is an oligarchy, to have it more purely so, and in the same manner if it is a democracy, or else to have it less so; and, in like manner, whatever may be the nature of the government, either to extend or contract its powers; or else to make some alterations in some parts of it; as to establish or abolish a particular magistracy, as some persons say Lysander endeavoured to abolish the kingly power in Sparta; and Pausanias that of the ephori.
The mode of locomotion is, of course, purely imaginary, and the incidents and adventures fictitious.
To the question of what causes historic events another answer presents itself, namely, that the course of human events is predetermined from on high- depends on the coincidence of the wills of all who take part in the events, and that a Napoleon's influence on the course of these events is purely external and fictitious.
The effect of Dickens is purely democratic, and however contemptible he found our pseudo-equality, he was more truly democratic than any American who had yet written fiction.
But the completer, the positive, soul, which will merely take [25] that mood into its service (its proper service, as we hold, is in counteraction to the vulgarity of purely positive natures) is also certainly in evidence in Amiel's "Thoughts"--that other, and far stronger person, in the long dialogue; the man, in short, possessed of gifts, not for the renunciation, but for the reception and use, of all that is puissant, goodly, and effective in life, and for the varied and adequate literary reproduction of it; who, under favourable circumstances, or even without them, will become critic, or poet, and in either case a creative force; and if he be religious (as Amiel was deeply religious) will make the most of "evidence," and almost certainly find a Church.