PUN

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PUN

Abbreviation for:
plasma urea nitrogen
patient unmet needs
References in periodicals archive ?
Christ, the epitome of the serious punster, said to one of his disciples called Simon, "You are Peter and upon your stone I'll build a Church.
Yet the word play though echoing a poet's associative vitality and spirit of plenty is hostile to the Irish punster.
8) Abelard was an atrocious punster, using doubles entendres even in solemn moments (see PMLHA, 129 n.
Stephen - who also takes part in the 49th series of I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue when it starts again on Radio 4 on Monday - traces the history of the Christmas cracker joke and meets monster punster Tim Vine, brother of BBC presenter Jeremy.
They would appear there another 273 times, usually introduced by Bob Wooler, the DJ, writer and punster, who would rename Mathew Street Myth-ew Street before his death in 2002, as he wearied of hearing stories about those days growing taller and taller until they toppled over.
Punster Tanaka also said she hopes the new ''gaisho'' (foreign minister) would not be a ''gaisho'' (external wound) to the new cabinet.
The work encompasses a veritable polyphony of individual voices: the poet himself, an intrusively nudging editor, a grouchy, self-loathing "old fart" a Nazi officer, a suavely Dantean worshipper, a crass punster, a strict schoolmaster, a dogmatormented theologian.
He was also an accomplished classicist and a determined punster in four languages (English, Greek, Latin, and Hebrew).
Bausch is, variously, a fearless primitive, a keen yet loving satirist, a punster who bridges the arcane and simplistic, a mensch with a worldview that does not shy away from sorrow, a purveyor of the unmitigated unconscious.
The slow poison of the multilingual punster had entered my bloodstream.
However, all my life--adolescence, even before then--I had always been a punster, and had always played word games with my friend.
There comes a time in every productive poet's life when she must winnow the harvest of her work and decide, if only finally for herself and more doubtfully for an approaching posterity, which of the fruits of her poetical labors, even if not obviously bruised or spiked with stubble, are to be consigned to oblivion (or, as the notorious punster Hollander might have put it, applivion).