punitive damages


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Related to punitive damages: compensatory damages

punitive damages

See damages.

punitive damages

Damages awarded in an amount intended to punish the defendant for the egregious nature of the tort. The defendant’s actions must be willful and wanton, and the damages are not based on the plaintiff’s actual monetary loss.
See also: damages

punitive damages

damages awarded by the court, in addition to damages awarded as compensation for loss, as a punishment to the guilty party and an assuagement to the suffering party.
References in periodicals archive ?
Courts use punitive damages in part to seek retribution against the wrongdoer.
These research findings support the claim that punitive damages are less psychologically satisfying when their sole function is to prevent harm by other potential tortfeasors, rather than to punish the specific wrongdoer who has transgressed.
Taken together, this body of research suggests that the psychology of punishment can provide a plausible alternative explanation for the nonsurvivability rule--one that does not rely on the implausible claim that posthumous punitive damages fail to serve general deterrence.
the OPA and in dicta extended the exclusion of punitive damages recovery
well as congressional silence on punitive damages under the OPA leaves
the question of punitive damages recovery open for future
None of the arguments against the availability of punitive damages in equity provides a sound basis for denying such relief in Florida.
Why Punitive Damages Should be Available, Generally--Florida courts should be deemed to have the legal authority to award punitive damages even when equitable relief is sought.
where and because punitive damages were unavailable under state law.
Williams (10)--all of which involved constitutional limits on punitive damages awards and affect all types of litigation.
Although the holding in Exxon Shipping applies only in the narrow context of punitive damages in maritime cases, Souter's reasoning was less about maritime law and more about the need for predictable and consistent rules for punitive damages awards.
Souter began his discussion with a review of the history of punitive damages awards, pointing out that "the claim goes to our understanding of the place of punishment in modern civil law and reasonable standards of process in administering punitive law, subjects that call for starting with a brief account of the history behind today's punitive damages.