pungency


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Related to pungency: piquancy, pungent, raciness

pungency

(pŭn′jĕn-sē) [L. pungens, prick]
The quality of being sharp, strong, or bitter, as an odor or taste.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is essential to maximize the flavour and pungency, and also to minimize contamination by foreign matter, stalk, husk, and micro-organisms.
Whether a peppercorn is green, black, white or pink, there is one factor that remains constant for all four varieties: their pungency, derived from three elements; resin, piperdine and volatile oil.
Q The dried herbs and spices in my cupboard lose their pungency - why is this?
Bottle only small amounts as dried herbs lose much of their pungency if stored for long periods.
With dynamics nicely shaded, he coaxed a warm glow from the brasses and attractive bloom from the strings, all without sacrificing pungency.
But many chemists have shunned them because of their pungency, says Michael C.
Use within six months as they will lose their pungency, but by that time the new growing season should have started again so you will be able to use fresh herbs.
Perhaps additional performing will provide the pungency that Thou Swell now lacks.
Each is well charged with carbonic acid gas, which imparts to them a sparkling appearance and an agreeable amount of pungency.
The sharpness of the tomatoes was complimented by the pungency of the basil pesto, with its salty parmesan edge.
is so frequently repeated that it loses pungency and becomes almost a parenthetic punctuation device.
Victor Brauner is less familiar than his Romanian compatriot Constantin Brancusi, yet his work in many genres--Cubist- and de Stijl-inspired abstraction, Dadaist collage, Surrealist furniture, and encaustic painting--has an ineffable Balkan pungency to it and should be better known.