pungency


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Related to pungency: piquancy, pungent, raciness

pungency

(pŭn′jĕn-sē) [L. pungens, prick]
The quality of being sharp, strong, or bitter, as an odor or taste.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a measure of the degree of dilution needed for the pungency of a chilli to be undetectable.
Sensory analysis of oils made from greener fruit has shown high bitterness and pungency, which correlates with laboratory analysis showing high polyphenol and antioxidant levels (Alba Mendoza et al.
Those hot and not chilies illustrate how "adaptations that are beneficial in one environment may be costly in another--for example, pungency in a dry climate," says Emily Jacobs-Palmer of Harvard University.
Adding peppermint essential oil into the coating layer can help overcome the restriction of AIT usage in packaging systems because of the inherent pungency of mustard oil.
Q The dried herbs and spices in my cupboard lose their pungency - why is this?
The pungency of any herbal or spice plant's foliage is usually blunted at the moment it produces flowers which, in turn, become seed-bearing fruits.
and cigarettes, scooter bells and tramcars, a pungency of curry
Moreover, the measurements of the enzymatically produced pyruvic acid is a very reliable indicator of flavour or pungency [5].
The thiosulfinates that give onions their pungency are also a great boon to the body's bloodstream.
In fact, research has shown that capsaicin (whose active ingredients in red or chili peppers impart pungency and heat) speeds up energy expenditure and increases lipid oxidation by activating the sympathetic nervous system.
An older woman/young turk feeling flavored intricately detailed duets with autunmal pungency.
what adds to the pungency of the reaction to defeat is that so many of the arguments were advanced before kick-off.