punctum


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Related to punctum: punctum remotum, sebaceous cyst, lacrimal punctum, Studium

punctum

 [pungk´tum] (L.)
a point or small spot.
punctum cae´cum blind spot.
punctum lacrima´le (pl. punc´ta lacrima´lia), an opening of a lacrimal duct on the edge of the eyelid.
punctum prox´imum near point.
punctum remo´tum far point.
punc´ta vasculo´sa minute red spots that mark the cut surface of white matter of the brain.

punc·tum

, gen.

punc·ti

, pl.

punc·ta

(pŭngk'tŭm, -tī, -tă), [TA]
1. The tip or end of a sharp process.
2. A minute round spot differing in color or otherwise in appearance from the surrounding tissues.
3. A point on the optic axis of an optic system.
Synonym(s): point (1)

See also: point, tip, end, center.
[L. a prick, point, pp. ntr. of pungo, to prick, used as noun]

punctum

/punc·tum/ (pungk´tum) pl. punc´ta   [L.] a point or small spot.
punctum cae´cum  blind spot.
punctum lacrima´le  lacrimal point.
punctum prox´imum  near point.
punctum remo´tum  far point.

punctum

[pungk′təm]
a physiological area or point.

punc·tum

, pl. puncta (pŭngk'tŭm, -tă) [TA]
1. The tip of a sharp process.
2. A minute round spot differing in color or otherwise in appearance from the surrounding tissues.
3. The opening into the lacrimal drainage system in the upper and lower eyelids.
Synonym(s): point (1) .
[L. a prick, point, pp. ntr. of pungo, to prick, used as noun]

Punctum

Tiny opening at the inner corners of the upper and lower lids. The area for the beginning of tear drainage.
Mentioned in: Dacryocystitis

punc·tum

, pl. puncta (pŭngk'tŭm, -tă) [TA]
1. Tip or end of a sharp process.
2. Minute round spot differing in color or otherwise in appearance from the surrounding tissues.
Synonym(s): point (1) .
[L. a prick, point, pp. ntr. of pungo, to prick, used as noun]

punctum

pl. puncta [L.] a point or small spot.

imperforate punctum
congenital absence of an opening in the lacrimal punctum, usually the lower, occurs most often in toy and miniature poodles. Commonly absent also in pigs.
misplaced punctum
variations in the position of the lacrimal puncta, seen most commonly in brachycephalic dogs, may interfere with tear drainage.
punctum nasolacrimal
see lacrimal punctum.
obstructed punctum
may result from foreign bodies, inflammation, or swelling of the lower eyelid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spectator--for whom the punctum establishes the way memory connects with the paths of the subconscious--is what brings these meanings into the photograph.
If performance appears as a spectral punctum connoting suicide in the Falling Man photograph, what significations are present in the continuum of body-performance-photography in Skarbakka's work?
The larva may also be gently extracted with sterile forceps when it starts to emerge from the punctum after Vaseline has been applied.
It is the existence of a punctum that leads to a distinctive reading of a photograph.
The researchers tested punctum plugs designed to deliver a sustained release anti-inflammatory pain medication (dexamethasone) to the eye over a period of 30 days following the removal of cataracts.
However, another notion that Barthes clings to persistently is more important for the current context: it is a certain attention of the observer, called for by a punctum, the Latin word for wound or puncture, which emanates from the photograph and triggers its effect.
Associated ocular pathologies--including dacryocystitis, agenesis of the lacrimal punctum and canaliculus, lacrimal tract stenosis, and infections of the lower eyelid--have been reported, as have hypertelorism and strabismus.
Through it we see another layer, a sheer stretched stocking, and through that, a newsprint photograph of Birmingham police attacking civil rights demonstrators, the reproduction etiolated as if it, in turn, opened onto a suppurating wound, an endless punctum.
There was a 1-mm central punctum and local tenderness.
iam vero ipsa terra ita mihi parva visa est, ut me imperii nostri, quo quasi punctum eius attingimus, paeniteret,
15) Barthes defines the punctum as detail in a photograph "which rises from the scene, shoots out of it like an arrow, and pierces me" (1981, 56).
Like the violinist or jazz musician who seems to know ahead of time where to put the fingers down on the strings to make the correct sound--a good poem anticipates, or even gestates its line breaks, which then function like the punctum in medieval music, a way of marking off a group of somewhat approximate, but appropriate, notations for the sake of clarity.