pumpkin


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pumpkin

Herbal medicine
An annual vine primarily used as a food or a decorative item; the seeds are anthelmintic.

pumpkin,

n Latin names:
Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita moschata; part used: seeds; uses: anthelmintic, tapeworms, benign pros-tatic hypertrophy, childhood enuresis, bladder irritation; precautions: pregnancy, lactation. Also called
cucurbita, pumpkinseed, or
vegetable marrow.

pumpkin

large edible fruit, used extensively as cattle feed and for human consumption, Cucurbita maxima.
References in periodicals archive ?
One night the worms rose up and ate every root the Pumpkin had underground and every green vine and leaf above ground.
Pumpkin has nutritional benefits for pets without health problems as well.
These ideas use canned pumpkin or frozen winter squash.
For a cat packing on some extra pounds, pumpkin can help in a weight-loss program.
Why bother to extricate the contents of a pumpkin yourself when there's pure pumpkin readily available in cans, they've reasoned.
5 billion pounds of pumpkin a year, so there are a plethora of ways pumpkin enthusiasts can enjoy the orange fruit.
We have seen the pumpkin season start earlier in the bakery in the last couple of years, with consumers beginning to clamor for all things pumpkin spice even before Labor Day," says Julie Dunmire, director, marketing --U.
Among the new offerings are Archer Farm's Pumpkin Spice Coffee, Archer Farms Pumpkin Pancake and Waffle Mix, and Pumpkin Spice Snack Bites.
Volunteers can participate in the Pumpkin Pledge Program, in which they collect pledge money per pumpkin or per pound of pumpkin grown.
People had their pictures taken with the pumpkins, exclaimed over the pumpkins' size, and asked questions of the members of the Franklin County Giant Pumpkin Growers Association on how they grew them.
The large, curved pumpkin stems also make great hooks to screw on a wall; they last a surprisingly long time.
In middle French, this became pompon, and in English pompion, then pumpion, and eventually pumpkin or punkin.