pulsus paradoxus


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pulsus

 [pul´sus] (L.)
pulsus alter´nans alternating pulse.
pulsus bige´minus bigeminal pulse.
pulsus bisfe´riens a pulse characterized by two strong systolic peaks separated by a midsystolic dip, most commonly occurring in pure aortic regurgitation with stenosis.
pulsus ce´ler quick pulse.
pulsus dif´ferens inequality of the pulse observable at corresponding sites on either side of the body.
pulsus paradox´us paradoxical pulse.
pulsus par´vus et tar´dus a small hard pulse that rises and falls slowly.
pulsus tar´dus slow pulse.

par·a·dox·ic pulse

an exaggeration of the normal variation in the systemic arterial pulse volume with respiration, becoming weaker with inspiration and stronger with expiration; characteristic of cardiac tamponade, rare in constrictive pericarditis; so called because these changes are independent of changes in the cardiac rate as measured directly or by electrocardiogram.

pulsus paradoxus

an abnormally large decrease in systolic blood pressure and pulse wave amplitude during inspiration. The normal fall in pressure is less than 10 mm Hg. An excessive decline may be a sign of tamponade, adhesive pericarditis, severe lung disease, advanced heart failure, or other conditions. Also called paradoxic pulse.

pulsus paradoxus

Cardiology A marked ↓ in pulse amplitude during normal quiet inspiration or a ↓ in the systolic pressure by > 10 mm Hg, a typical finding in cardiac tamponade, less common in constrictive pericarditis–quantifiable by a sphygmomanometer, superior vena cava obstruction, asthma, PE, shock, or after thoracotomy

par·a·dox·ic pulse

(par'ă-doks'ik pŭls)
A reversal of the normal variation in the pulse volume with respiration, the pulse becoming weaker with inspiration and stronger with expiration; characteristic of cardiac tamponade and rare in constrictive pericarditis. So called because these changes are independent of changes in the cardiac rate as measured directly or by electrocardiogram.
Synonym(s): pulsus paradoxus.

pulsus

[L.] pulse.

pulsus alternans
see alternating pulse.
pulsus bigeminus
bigeminal pulse.
pulsus bisferiens
a pulse characterized by two strong systolic peaks separated by a midsystolic dip, most commonly occurring in pure aortic regurgitation and in aortic regurgitation with stenosis.
pulsus celer
a swift, abrupt pulse.
pulsus differens
inequality of the pulse obervable at corresponding sites on either side of the body.
pulsus paradoxus
an abnormal inspiratory decrease in arterial blood pressure, seen in cardiac tamponade and caused by a decreased pulmonary venous return.
pulsus parvus et tardus
a small hard pulse that rises and falls slowly.
pulsus tardus
an abnormally slow pulse.
References in periodicals archive ?
His oxygen saturation was 94%, although he had inspiratory and expiratory stridor, a sternal tug and a pulsus paradoxus.
Additionally, his pulse was poorer when he was breathing in, a phenomenon called pulsus paradoxus.
Pulsus paradoxus is absent because accessory muscles of ventilation are not in use.
Leftward shift of the interventricular septum and pulsus paradoxus in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.
Simultaneously observing the arterial pressure and waveform looking for beat-to-beat variability in the pulse pressure can aid in detecting arrhythmias and pulsus paradoxus.
In the patient with ACT, pulsus paradoxus is the result of impairment of diastolic filling of the left ventricle, and the subsequent decreased blood volume in all four cardiac chambers.
Pulsus paradoxus, well described and observed, is nothing other than a demonstration of systolic pressure variation.
The effect is similar to cardiac tamponade and a marked pulsus paradoxus may be noted.
However, it is useful to note that there are several conditions in which a pulsus paradoxus will be absent in the presence of cardiac tamponade.
Severity of acute asthma (exacerbations) * Mild Moderate Breathless Walking Talking Can lie down Prefer sitting Talks in Sentences Phrases Alertness May be agitated Usually agitated Respiratory rate Increased Increased Accessory muscles and Usually not Usually suprasternal retractions Wheeze Moderate Loud Pulse rate (/min) <100 100-120 Pulsus paradoxus Absent <10 mmHg May be present <20 mmHg PEF after initial >80% Approx.
No jugular venous distention, Kussmaul's sign, pulsus paradoxus, or ascites were noted.