pulp chamber


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Related to pulp chamber: pulp canal, pulp extirpation

pulp cham·ber

that portion of the pulp cavity contained in the crown or body of the tooth.

pulp chamber

the space occupied by the nerves, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels deep within the crown of the tooth. Internal anatomy of the tooth progresses from pulp chamber to pulp canal to apex.

pulp cham·ber

(pŭlp chām'běr)
The portion of the pulp cavity that is contained in the crown or body of the tooth.

Pulp chamber

The area within the natural crown of the tooth occupied by dental pulp.
Mentioned in: Root Canal Treatment

pulp cham·ber

(pŭlp chām'běr)
That portion of the pulp cavity contained in the crown or body of the tooth.
See also: dental pulp

pulp

any soft, juicy animal or vegetable tissues, e.g. citrus pulp.

pulp canal
root canal.
pulp cap
pulp of the feather produced inside the calamus by the follicular tissue. The pulp protrudes through the aperture in the wall of the shaft and forms the external pulp caps. Internal pulp caps are formed within the calamus.
pulp cavity
the pulp chamber and the root canal in a tooth.
pulp chamber
the cavity at the center of the tooth which contains most of the pulp.
dental pulp
see dental pulp.
pulp polyp
superficial hyperplasia of dental pulp, usually after exposure due to injury such as fracture of a tooth.
red pulp, splenic pulp
the dark reddish brown substance filling the interspaces of the splenic sinuses.
tooth pulp
dental pulp.
white pulp
sheaths of lymphatic tissue surrounding the arteries of the spleen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roentgenographically, the bulbous appearance and constriction at the cervix are more evident, and obliteration of pulp chambers and the root canals can be seen.
The pulp chambers appear to be duplicated, and taurodontism (long pulp chambers and short roots) may be present.
Taurodontism In taurodontism the pulp chambers are enlarged in an apical direction and the bifurcation or trifurcation point of the molars is also displaced toward the apex.
Radiographically, the crowns were bulbous with marked cervical constriction; dentine and enamel were normal in density, but pulp chambers were obliterated (Figure 1b).
There were no signs of severe root shortening and tooth mobility as described for DD type I and no pulp stones or 'thistle shaped' pulp chambers were found, which is characteristic of DD type II [Huth et al.
The radicular and pulp chambers are characteristically enlarged, with pulp horns extending to the dentino-enamel junction [Fadavi and Rowold, 1990; Larmas et al.