pulp cavity


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Related to pulp cavity: pulp extirpation

cavity

 [kav´ĭ-te]
1. a hollow or space, or a potential space, within the body or one of its organs; called also caverna and cavum.
2. the lesion produced by dental caries.
Cavities in the body. From Applegate, 2000.
abdominal cavity the cavity of the body between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below, containing the abdominal organs.
absorption c's cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
glenoid cavity a depression in the lateral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
marrow cavity (medullary cavity) the cavity that contains bone marrow in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity the proximal portion of the passages of the respiratory system, extending from the nares to the pharynx; it is divided into left and right halves by the nasal septum and is separated from the oral cavity by the hard palate.
oral cavity the cavity of the mouth, bounded by the jaw bones and associated structures (muscles and mucosa).
pelvic cavity the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity the potential space between the two layers of pleura.
pulp cavity the pulp-filled central chamber in the crown of a tooth.
cavity of septum pellucidum the median cleft between the two laminae of the septum pellucidum. Called also pseudocele, pseudocoele, and fifth ventricle.
serous cavity a coelomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum, or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e., one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity the portion of the ventral body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm; it contains the pleural cavity.
tympanic cavity the major portion of the middle ear, consisting of a narrow air-filled cavity in the temporal bone that contains the auditory ossicles and communicates with the mastoid air cells and the mastoid antrum by means of the aditus and the nasopharynx by means of the auditory tube. The middle ear and the tympanic cavity were formerly regarded as being synonymous.
uterine cavity the flattened space within the uterus communicating proximally on either side with the fallopian tubes and below with the vagina.

pulp cav·i·ty

[TA]
the central hollow of a tooth consisting of the pulp cavity of the crown and the root canal; it contains the fibrovascular dental pulp and is lined throughout by odontoblasts.

pulp cavity

the space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. It is divided into the pulp chamber and the pulp canal.

pulp cav·i·ty

(pŭlp kav'i-tē) [TA]
The central hollow of a tooth consisting of the crown cavity and the root canal; it contains the fibrovascular dental pulp and is lined throughout by odontoblasts.

pulp cavity

the cavity within the tooth of vertebrates, containing nerves, blood vessels, connective tissue and odontoblasts, which opens into the tissues in which the tooth is embedded.

pulp cav·i·ty

(pŭlp kav'i-tē) [TA]
Central hollow of tooth consisting of pulp cavity of crown and root canal; contains fibrovascular dental pulp and is lined throughout by odontoblasts.
Synonym(s): cavitas dentis [TA] , cavity of tooth, cavum dentis.

cavity

1. a hollow or space, or a potentional space, within the body (e.g. abdominal cavity) or one of its organs (e.g. cranial cavity).
2. in teeth, the lesion produced by dental caries.

absorption c's
cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity
the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity
the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
dental cavity
1. the central space, often branched or multiple in compound teeth, of each tooth; carries the nerve and blood supplies to the teeth.
2. the defect caused by decay on a tooth surface. Called also caries.
glenoid cavity
a depression in the ventral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
infraglottic cavity
the space in the larynx caudal to the vocal folds; reflects the shape of the cricoid cartilage.
medullary (marrow) cavity
the cavity, containing marrow, in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity
the proximal part of the respiratory tract, within the nose, bisected by the nasal septum and extending from the nares to the pharynx. Much of the cavity is occupied by the turbinate bones or conchae which also divide it into dorsal, medial and ventral meatuses. The common meatus is the narrow, vertical passage close to the nasal septum. The rostral end of the cavity just inside the nostril is the nasal vestibule, and the caudal part opening into the pharynx is the nasopharyngeal meatus.
oral cavity
the cavity of the mouth, made up of a vestibule and oral cavity proper.
pelvic cavity
the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity
the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral pleura.
pulp cavity
the pulp-filled central chamber in a tooth; called also dental cavity.
serous cavity
a celomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e. one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity
cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity
the body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm.
tympanic cavity
the cavity of the middle ear.
uterine cavity
the space within the uterus communicating on either side with the uterine tubes and caudally with the vagina.

pulp

any soft, juicy animal or vegetable tissues, e.g. citrus pulp.

pulp canal
root canal.
pulp cap
pulp of the feather produced inside the calamus by the follicular tissue. The pulp protrudes through the aperture in the wall of the shaft and forms the external pulp caps. Internal pulp caps are formed within the calamus.
pulp cavity
the pulp chamber and the root canal in a tooth.
pulp chamber
the cavity at the center of the tooth which contains most of the pulp.
dental pulp
see dental pulp.
pulp polyp
superficial hyperplasia of dental pulp, usually after exposure due to injury such as fracture of a tooth.
red pulp, splenic pulp
the dark reddish brown substance filling the interspaces of the splenic sinuses.
tooth pulp
dental pulp.
white pulp
sheaths of lymphatic tissue surrounding the arteries of the spleen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The coronal pulp cavity index: A biomarker for age determination in human adults.
m long); head and anterior part of trunk wide, dorsoventrally flattened, posterior part of trunk and caudal fin laterally compressed; paired pectoral fins, single dorsal and anal fin, and hypocercal caudal fin present; caudal fin strongly heterocercal in young individuals, becoming nearly symmetrical in adults; orbits on anterolateral corners of head; scale morphology variable depending on position on body; pulp cavity single, occasionally continuing as pulp canal posteriorly; dentine tubules long, narrow, straight.
Small to medium-sized thelodonts; squamation composed of small scales with rows of larger scales between them; trunk scales medium to large, compact, high, conical or cockscomb-like; base as shallow rim; pulp depression or cavity large and deep; pulp cavity of trunk scales continuing as pulp canal into posterior tip of crown; dentine tubules fine, densely packed, simple and relatively straight in crown, sinuous in neck and anterior to base.
7 mm), high, with cockscomb-like serrated crest, with fine ridges or rows of elongate short tubercles lateral to crown; base as oval, very shallow rim; pulp depression or pulp cavity deep; dentine tubules fine, simple, relatively straight, densely packed in crown, sinuous in neck and anterior to base.
7 mm high; upper medial area of crown finely striated longitudinally; lateral narrow area on both sides smooth or with shorter striae posteriorly; crests of crowns cockscomb-like, serrated; neck indistinct; base oval, with very shallow and weak rim; pulp depression or pulp cavity deep; fine dentine tubules simple, relatively straight, densely packed in crown, sinuous in neck and anterior to base.
1 mm; pulp cavity deep or overgrown; pulp canal absent; dentine tubules simple, straight, distributed densely in crown, sparsely in neck and in upper part of base.
0 mm), longitudinally elongate, cuneiform, or high and spiny, with flat or ridged medial crown area and ridged or wing-like, lateral areas with one or several indentions; one to two parallel longitudinal ridges occurring on posterior lateral surface of crown; neck distinct; base rounded to oval, low; pulp cavity deep and continuing with one pulp canal; dentine tubules long, narrow and straight anteriorly in the crown, sinuous posteriorly.
branchial tooth plate teeth, gillraker teeth; see below) in shape, attachment (usually not becoming detached during processing) and in lacking both the pulp cavity and well-developed, distinct acrodin cap (spinule tips can be translucent, but this appearance is confined to a small region near the tip).
These teeth exhibit loose attachment and are easily separated from their circular bases; both bases and tooth shafts have a hollow pulp cavity (Fig.
the various pulp cavity configurations the number of root canals the number of roots the direction and longitudinal depressions of the roots and the difficulties in visualizing the apical limit by radiographs make endodontic treatment of the maxillary second premolars challenging for dentist.
Knowledge of the morphology of the pulp cavity is essential for successful root canal therapy.
The distribution of ABH substances from the pulp cavity wall to the dentine edge and to the enamel decreases gradually because of fewer possibilities for diffusion of antigen from both blood and saliva.