pulmonate

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pulmonate

(po͝ol′mə-nāt′, pŭl′-)
adj.
Having lungs or lunglike organs.
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Terrestrial pulmonate snails have proven to be particularly troublesome, and deep intraspecific divergence in the COI of these species may not be uncommon.
Arthropods consisted of 49 species of insects (26 families 41 genera) twelve species of arachnids (six families ten genera) and nine species of pulmonates (eight families nine genera).
This array of nerves from the pedal ganglion seen in three terrestrial pulmonates is markedly different from the pedal ganglia nerves of the aquatic pulmonate pond snail Lymnaea.
glabrata is an intermediate snail host of Schistosoma mansoni, population control of these pulmonates is a prominent concern.
japonica did not group with other marine schistosomes, but belong to the BTGD clade that, until now, included only freshwater species that use pulmonate snails as intermediate hosts (Figure 5).
Macro-invertebrate predators of freshwater pulmonates in Africa with particular reference to Appasus grassei (Heteroptera) and Procambarus clarkii (Decapoda).
mantle or foot) because Machin (1975) found that water is lost similarly from all exposed surfaces of the body of a terrestrial pulmonate body at humidities < 99.
The pulmonates (Ancylidae, Lymnaeidae, Physidae, and Planorbidae) are more resistant to organic pollution.
Pearce found that loping had been reported to occur in a diversity of pulmonates (nine species in three families), tentatively rejected the hypothesis that loping allows for more rapid locomotion than adhesive crawling, and suggested several alternative hypotheses on its functional and adaptive signficance (specifically, that loping might confound trail-following predators, that it might reduce contact of the foot with irritating substrates, and that it might reduce expenditure of mucus on dry substrates).
Laboratory studies on the life history of pulmonates are considered to be extremely important for developing an understanding of their complex reproductive processes and determining the environmental factors that influence them (Gomot de Vaufleury 2001, Heller 2001).