pull

(redirected from pulls)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

pull

(pdbobrl)
1. to strain a muscle.
2. the injury sustained in a muscle strain.

pull

Pharmacology
verb To remove a drug from the marketplace, usually because of adverse reactions.
 
Sexology verb
A primarily British usage, meaning:
(1) To kiss someone;
(2) To initiate a seduction;
(3) To attract (pull) a sexually desirable person in one’s immediate surroundings.

pull

A colloquial term for a muscle strain.

pull

to remove a sick animal from a pen in a feedlot for treatment. See also daily pull and dead records.

pull rate
a daily percentage of the cattle in a feedlot which are pulled out of the feeding pens and relegated to the hospital yards or sent for emergency slaughter.

Patient discussion about pull

Q. Pulling pain in anus. Dear friends, I am 32. I feel a Pulling pain in anus sometimes while i finish passing stool and some times when i sit for long time. No bleeding so far. Is it a symptoms of piles? If so what can be done to cure it without going to doctor or operation. Please help me. This pain makes me to feel that i am very old.

A. horsechestnut is supposed to help...here is some info about it:
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/horsechestnut/index.htm#uses

but i wouldn't get my hopes high.

Q. What would you do if a friend showed up to your house and pulled out a quarter pound of cocaine? True story: What would you do if a friend showed up to your house and pulled out a quarter pound of cocaine, and a bunch of other narcotics all bagged up individually, and then asked if you wanted the first go at them?

A. First of all, I'd probably go ‘Hey, what do you think you are DOING with all that! And why the hell are you at my house with this load of rubbish?? But then I'd probably calm down a bit, and we'd go round to the police station, just round the corner from my place and hand it in. I have a lot more conscience now than I used to and there is no way I am going to encourage a situation like this!

More discussions about pull
References in classic literature ?
Micawber, at the then present moment, took a pull at his punch.
Don't pull it; you've got it all wrong, you stupid ass
He shifted his feet slightly, tautened his muscles with a tentative pull, then relaxed again, questing for a perfect adjustment of all the levers of his body.
when he pulls the string actuating its bones its gestures are
The attentive porter, on the look-out for his fee pulls down the blinds over the side windows of the carriage, and shuts out all prying eyes in that way.
you would never guess what extraordinary events are revealed by the anagram of this sacramental sentence" [he pulls out a piece of paper and reads], "Charles dix, par la grace de Dieu, roi de France et de Navarre.
Three pulls from eager arms, and the two combatants, dripping and pale, were dragged up the bank, and lay panting upon the grass.
No man pulls another man's sled, wherefore the man is killed.
And if it isn't carried in just a certain way the handle pulls out--so I'd better keep it because I know the exact knack of it.
The man now prepares to mount by pressing heavily on the stirrup, so that the horse may not lose its balance; and at the moment that he throws his leg over the animal's back, he pulls the slip-knot binding the front legs, and the beast is free.
If I should only give a few pulls at the parish bell-rope, as for a fire, that is, without setting the bell, there is hardly a man on his farm in the outskirts of Concord, notwithstanding that press of engagements which was his excuse so many times this morning, nor a boy, nor a woman, I might almost say, but would forsake all and follow that sound, not mainly to save property from the flames, but, if we will confess the truth, much more to see it burn, since burn it must, and we, be it known, did not set it on fire -- or to see it put out, and have a hand in it, if that is done as handsomely; yes, even if it were the parish church itself.
And now the dawn breaks at the end of the fourth stage, and the coach pulls up at a little roadside inn with huge stables behind.