pudendal nerve


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pu·den·dal nerve

[TA]
branch of the sacral plexus formed by fibers from the ventral primary rami of the second, third, and fourth sacral spinal nerves; it exits the pelvis via the greater sciatic foramen, passes posterior to the sacrospinous ligament, and accompanies the internal pudendal artery, into the perineum via the lesser sciatic foramen; it gives off inferior rectal nerves, then courses through the pudendal canal in the lateral wall of the ischiorectal fossa, terminating as the dorsal nerve of the penis or of the clitoris.

pudendal nerve

one of the branches of the pudendal plexus that arises from the second, third, and fourth sacral nerves; passes between the piriformis and coccygeus; and leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen. It divides into five branches supplying the external genital structures and the pelvic region. The branches of the pudendal nerve are the inferior rectal nerve, perineal nerve, and dorsal nerve of the penis or of the clitoris. See also pudendal plexus.

pu·den·dal nerve

(pyū-den'dăl nĕrv) [TA]
Formed by fibers from the ventral primary rami of the second, third, and fourth sacral spinal nerves; it exits the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen, passes posterior to the sacrospinous ligament, and accompanies the internal pudendal artery into the perineum through the lesser sciatic foramen; it gives off inferior rectal nerves, then courses through the pudendal canal in the lateral wall of the ischiorectal fossa, terminating as the dorsal nerve of the penis or of the clitoris.
Synonym(s): nervus pudendus [TA] .

pudendal nerve

A mixed nerve composed of axons from spinal nerves S2–S4. It follows the sciatic nerve out of the pelvis but immediately reenters through the lesser sciatic foramen. It innervates most of the structures of the perineum: it is sensory to the genitals and motor to the perineal muscles, the external urethral sphincter, and the external anal sphincter.
See also: nerve
References in periodicals archive ?
Pudendal nerve palsy complicating intramedullary nailing of the femur.
In fact, pudendal neuralgia and pudendal nerve entrapment specifically may be caused by various forms of pelvic trauma, from vaginal delivery (with or without instrumentation) and heavy lifting or falls on the back or pelvis, to previous gynecologic surgery such as hysterectomy cystocele repair, and mesh procedures for prolapse and incontinence.
Functionally, the pudendal nerve ensures the sensitivity of the perineum teguments (the glans penis, clitoris, scrotum, labia majora, skin of the central fibrous perineal body, and anus).
We developed pudendal nerve neuromodulation at Beaumont through research studies starting in 2004," says Dr.
Anatomic basis of chronic perineal pain: role of the pudendal nerve.
One possible etiology for RCPPP is pudendal nerve (PN) neuralgia, which is characterized by pain in the genitalia, perineum, and anorectal region.
In patients with fecal incontinence, for example, anal ultrasound is the cornerstone of treatment, but anal manometry, EMG, and pudendal nerve assessment "round out the evaluation," she said at a symposium on pelvic floor disorders sponsored by the Cleveland Clinic Florida.
CHICAGO -- Surgical decompression can improve chronic pelvic pain and disability in patients with refractory pudendal neuropathy caused by entrapment of the pudendal nerve, Lee Ansell, M.
If your pain persist you may require a pudendal nerve block.
Neuromodulation of Bladder Activity by Stimulation of Feline Pudendal Nerve Using Transdermal Amplitude Modulated Signal (TAMS).
ATLANTA -- Preemptive pudendal nerve blockade had no effect on postoperative pain or use of narcotic analgesia in a prospective randomized study of patients undergoing pelvic reconstructive surgery.
The tests--colonic motility study, anorectal manometry, defecography, electromyography and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency--serve to differentiate a pelvic outlet obstruction, which is the problem in a majority of patients, from colonic inertia.