publication


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Related to publication: Publication 4681, Publication 502, Publication 946

publication

(pŭb″lĭ-kā′shŭn) [L. publicare, to make public]
1. The dissemination of information in print.
2. Any document, journal, or text distributed to a general audience or to a limited readership.
References in classic literature ?
At the same time, there always has been a steady sale of his books in England, and some of them never have been out of print in that country since the publication of 'Typee.
The present writer lived for some time within a short distance of his house, but found no opportunity to meet him until it became necessary to obtain his portrait for an anthology in course of publication.
So it was that he entered abruptly upon a lean period, wherein he continued selling his earlier efforts to publications that would not pay and submitting his later work to magazines that would not buy.
Areopagitica,' an, eloquent and noble argument against the licensing system and in favor of freedom of publication within the widest possible limits.
Nietzsche tells us here, in a poetical form, how deeply grieved he was by the manifold misinterpretations and misunderstandings which were becoming rife concerning his publications.
12 The publication of this era which most probably has influenced these fables, is the "Liber Facetiarum," l3 a book consisting of a hundred jests and stories, by the celebrated Poggio Bracciolini, published A.
During the interval of three centuries which has elapsed since the publication of this volume of Nevelet's, no book, with the exception of the Holy Scriptures, has had a wider circulation than Aesop's Fables.
Whether she wanted a light, or whether she wanted a drop, there was a precious publication to meet her eye, or to meet her hand, and to say with silent eloquence, in either case, "Come, try me
I had my mission of mercy to fulfil, and my bag of precious publications ready on my lap.
With very few exceptions, all the so-called Socialist and Communist publications that now (1847) circulate in Germany belong to the domain of this foul and enervating literature.
Several sections of this book and its introduction had appeared in periodical publications, and other parts had been read by Sergey Ivanovitch to persons of his circle, so that the leading ideas of the work could not be completely novel to the public.
From personal intercourse with accomplished gentlemen connected with publications of this class, I have derived both pleasure and profit.