public health


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Related to public health: Masters in Public Health

public health

 
the field of health science that is concerned with safeguarding and improving the physical, mental, and social well-being of the community as a whole. The united states public health service (USPHS) is a federal health agency that is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. State and county public health agencies function under the supervision of and with financial support from the Department of Health and Human Services.
public health nursing the branch of nursing concerned with providing nursing care and health guidance to individuals, families, and other population groups in settings such as the home, school, workplace, and other community settings such as medical and health centers. The nurse in this field, a community health nurse, must have a baccalaureate degree and training in public health nursing theory and practice; employment is typically with a local agency such as a nonprofit proprietary organization or with an agency under the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The work involves implementing such programs as school and preschool health programs, immunization and treatment of communicable diseases, maternal and child health clinics, and home visits for the purpose of providing health education and nursing care. There is also frequent participation in educational programs for nurses, allied professional workers, and civic organizations, and involvement in studying, planning, formulating public policy, and putting into action local and national health programs.

pub·lic health

the art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and the prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases; an effort organized by society to promote, protect, and restore the people's health; public health is a social institution, a service, and a practice.

public health

n.
The science and practice of protecting and improving the health of a community, as by preventive medicine, health education, control of communicable diseases, application of sanitary measures, and monitoring of environmental hazards.

public health

Etymology: L, publicus, of the people; AS, haelth
a field of medicine that deals with the physical and mental health of the community, particularly in such areas as water supply, waste disposal, air pollution, and food safety. In the United States there are more than 3000 state, county, or city public health agencies. The U.S. Public Health Service was organized in 1798 to provide hospital care for American merchant seamen. Subsequent legislation has expanded the role of the federal agency to include such services as the Food and Drug Administration; the National Library of Medicine; health care for Native Americans and Alaska Natives; protection against impure and unsafe foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices; control of alcohol and drug abuse; and protection against unsafe radiation-producing projects.

public health

As defined by The Faculty of Public Health Medicine (UK), public health is “The science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organised efforts of society”. Some public health messages have been delivered at national level such as Change4life and smoking cessation.

pub·lic health

(pub'lik helth)
The art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and the prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases; an effort organized by society to promote, protect, and restore the people's health; public health is a social institution, a service, and a practice.

public health

The branch of medicine concerned with prevention of disease (see PREVENTIVE MEDICINE) and the promotion of health in populations by organizing efficient systems of sanitation, by controlling communicable diseases, by ensuring safety in the workplace, by public health education and by the provision and organization of medical, nursing and ancillary health services. An extensive organization of agencies exists to administer public health.

pub·lic health

(pub'lik helth)
Art and science of community health, concerned with statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, and prevention and eradication of epidemic diseases.

public health,

n a field of medicine that deals with the physical and mental health of the community, particularly in such areas as water supply, waste disposal, air pollution, and food safety.
public health authority,
n a governmental agency responsible for matters of public health.
public health dentistry,

public health

the field of human medicine that is concerned with safeguarding and improving the physical, mental and social well-being of the community as a whole. There are marginal roles for veterinarians in this service, especially in the area of zoonoses.

veterinary public health health
the part played by veterinarians in human public health, relating chiefly to the recognition and control of zoonotic disease.

Patient discussion about public health

Q. what is public health insurance

A. Public health insurance programs in the U.S. provide the primary source of health expenses coverage for most seniors and for low-income children and families who meet certain eligibility requirements. The primary public programs are Medicare, a federal social insurance program for seniors and certain disabled individuals and Medicaid, funded jointly by the federal government and states but administered at the state level, which covers certain very low income children and their families. In 2006, there were 47 million people in the United States (16% of the population) who were without health insurance for at least part of that year.

Q. is there any low or any public notify that lets people know a dangerous alcohol can be?

A. alcohol is a drug BUT it is LEGAL an the government gets alot of taxes from it. The companies make a lot of money from people drinking,this is one of the reasons there is no programs about how bad it is. remember the cigerette companys said that smoking was safe 50yrs ago an was lying.cigerettes was proven to cause cancer 50yrs ago. alcohol was proven to cause liver disease???????

More discussions about public health
References in periodicals archive ?
It's also the only MPH program in the Caribbean that can induct public health workers and MPH graduates into Delta Omega, the world's oldest public health honor society.
She added: 'As the experts in public health, health visitors and school nurses should have early dialogue with local directors of public health.
Advances in public health research slowed during the decades of the 1960s through the 1980s, when the nation's policy and research attention turned to medical care financing and cost containment through innovations such as Medicare, Medicaid, community health centers, and commercial HMOs.
Broad dissemination of research results: Throughout the course of the project, we disseminated our research to a wide audience through invitational meetings and workshops, publications in legal and public health journals, presentations at events across Canada, and a webpage with links to PowerPoint presentations, articles written by team members, and updates on new public health legislation, reports and other initiatives (see http://www.
In her presentation, Combined Vaccination Delivery to Remote and Mobile Pastoral Families and Their Animals, Esther Schelling, Swiss Tropical Institute, focused on the potential of joining public health and veterinary services to achieve higher vaccination coverage in Africa's remote rural settings.
Similarly, Oliver notes that public health specialists in the U.
In recent years, separate public health departments have been created in New York City, Boston, Houston, Miami and Seattle.
In her book Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health, Laurie Garrett reports that the federal government is failing to scrutinize imported food to reduce the amounts of disease-producing organisms that get into this country.
In a growing scientific consensus, public health officials believe the next drought will give this serious virus even a wider reach.
The provincial share of public health funding will increase to 55 per cent in 2005 and grow to 75 per cent in 2007, providing stable funding to municipalities for public health.
On January 1, 1998, funding responsibility for public health programs was transferred to Ontario municipalities through the passage of the Services Improvement Act (SIA) which amended the Health Protection and Promotion Act.
THE MINISTRY of Health wants a clearer picture of the makeup of New Zealand's public health workforce.

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