ptomaine

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ptomaine

 [to´mān, to-mān´]
any of several toxic bases formed by decarboxylation of an amino acid, often by bacterial action, such as cadaverine, muscarine, and putrescine.
ptomaine poisoning a term commonly misapplied to food poisoning. Contrary to popular belief, ptomaines are not injurious to the human digestive system, which is quite capable of reducing them to harmless substances.

pto·maine

(tō'mān, tō-mān'),
An indefinite term applied to poisonous substances (for example, toxic amines) formed in the decomposition of protein by the decarboxylation of amino acids by bacterial action.
Synonym(s): ptomatine
[G. ptōma, a corpse]

ptomaine

/pto·maine/ (to´mān) (to-mān´) any of an indefinite class of toxic bases, usually considered to be formed by the action of bacterial metabolism or proteins.

ptomaine

(tō′mān′, tō-mān′)
n.
A basic nitrogenous organic compound produced by bacterial putrefaction of protein.

ptomaine

[tō′mān]
Etymology: Gk, ptoma, corpse
an imprecise term introduced in the 19th century to identify a group of nitrogenous substances found in putrefied proteins. Because injection of the substances produced toxic reactions, the ptomaines were once regarded as poisonous. Later studies showed that the same substances were produced by the normal digestion of proteins in the human intestine without toxic effects.

pto·maine

(tō'mān)
An indefinite term applied to poisonous substances (e.g., toxic amines) formed in the decomposition of protein by the decarboxylation of amino acids by bacterial action.
[G. ptōma, a corpse]

ptomaine

any of an indefinite class of toxic bases, usually considered to be formed by the action of bacterial metabolism on proteins.

ptomaine poisoning
a term commonly misapplied to food poisoning. Contrary to popular belief, ptomaines are not injurious to the carnivorous or omnivorous digestive systems, which are quite capable of reducing them to harmless substances. Decomposed foods are often responsible for food poisoning, however, because they may harbor certain forms of poison-producing bacteria, especially Clostridium botulinum.