psychotrophic

psy·cho·tro·phic

(sīkō-trōpik)
Denotes a pharmacotherapeutic agent that affects brain function, usually used in the context of drugs.
[G. psychros, cold, + trophē, growth, nourishment, + -ic, adj. suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
SurePure's academic research suggested we should also enjoy approximately a 10% yield increase due to the reduction of psychotrophic bacteria in the milk, which is the increase that we in fact experienced.
In the section 'Professionals Perceptions' it was noted that Dixon was "at risk of relapse", as he had suddenly stopped all psychotrophic (mental health medication).
Survey for psychotrophic bacterial pathogens in minimally processed lettuce.
Cold-active serine alkaline protease from the psychotrophic bacterium Shewanella strain Ac 10: gene cloning and enzyme purification and characterization.
Bahnassi said he did not keep track of how much he made, but that the fees were for giving seminars to other doctors on new psychotrophic (central nervous system) medications.
Currently, the highest risk category for hip fractures of postmenopausal, white women are those who have low calcium intake, smoke cigarettes, use psychotrophic drugs, or abuse alcohol (Kelsey, 1989).
A psychiatrist and a registered nurse also are available one day per week to provide psychotrophic medication evaluation and management.
277) For instance, engaging in rituals found detrimental to public health or morality, or improperly using drugs, psychotrophic devices, and hypnosis during their ceremonies, are some; of the grounds for liquidation.
Part Two covers methods of evaluation of various technologically significant microflora, and includes total aerobic mesophilic microflora, psychotrophic microflora, lactic microflora, detection and enumeration of bacteriophages of lactic starters, yeasts and molds.