psychosomatic disorder


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psychosomatic

 [si″ko-so-mat´ik]
pertaining to the interrelations of mind and body; having bodily symptoms of psychic, emotional, or mental origin.
psychosomatic disorder (psychosomatic illness) a disorder in which the physical symptoms are caused or exacerbated by psychological factors, such as migraine headache, lower back pain, or irritable bowel syndrome; see also somatoform disorders. It is now recognized that emotional factors play a role in the development of nearly all organic illnesses and that the physical symptoms experienced by the patient are related to many interdependent factors, including psychological and cultural. The physical manifestations of an illness, unless caused by mechanical trauma, cannot be divorced from a person's emotional life. Each person responds in a unique way to stress; emotions affect one's sensitivity to trauma and to irritating elements in the environment, susceptibility to infection, and ability to recover from the effects of illness. Physical conditions to which psychological factors are shown to be contributory are currently classified as psychological factors affecting medical condition. Any physical condition can be so classified, but the most frequently included are asthma, peptic ulcer, bowel disorders, cardiovascular disorders, arthritis, allergy, headache, and certain endocrine disorders. In recent years there has been some success in using behavior therapy to treat these and other illnesses whose symptoms are related to the autonomic nervous system. Clients are taught new ways of coping with stress and new patterns of behavior. Among the techniques used are biofeedback, relaxation training, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning using social and material reinforcement.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic dis·or·der

, psychophysiologic disorder
a disorder characterized by physical symptoms of psychic origin, usually involving a single organ system innervated by the autonomic nervous system; physiologic and organic changes stem from a sustained disturbance.

psychosomatic disorder

A clinical complex, as delineated by the DSM-IV, in which:  
(1) An individual has a biological predisposition to a particular condition, which may have genetic, trauma-related or other predisposing factors; 
(2) The individual has a vulnerable personality—i.e., there is a type or degree of stress that the individual’s coping mechanism and ego structure cannot manage; and
(3) The individual must experience a significant psychosocial stress in his or her susceptible personality area.

psychosomatic disorder

Psychiatry A condition in which
1. A person has a biologic predisposition to a particular condition–genetic, trauma-related, etc;.
2. The person has a vulnerable personality–ie, there is a type or degree of stress that the coping mechanism and ego structure cannot manage;.
3. The person must experience a significant psychosocial stress in a susceptible personality area. See Factitious disorders, Psychogenic 'syndromes. '.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic dis·or·der

, psychophysiologic disorder (sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik dis-ōr'dĕr, sī'kō-fiz'ē-ŏ-loj'ik)
A disorder characterized by physical symptoms of psychic origin, usually involving a single organ system innervated by the autonomic nervous system; physiologic and organic changes stem from a sustained disturbance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter Three, "Melancholic Subversions in Moliere's Le misanthrope (1666) and Le malade imaginaire (1673)," posits psychosomatic disorders as both a symptom of, and a revolt against, social alienation under Louis XIV.
Psychosomatic disorders prevailing in this group of people were of low (dissociative 85%) and average intensity (digestive system disorders 57%).
More importantly, biracial youth may experience depression or exhibit maladaptive behaviors such as substance abuse, psychosomatic disorders, and suicidal ideation (Herring, 1995; Poston, 1990; Winn & Priest, 1993).
No detailed nationwide survey on the problems has been conducted despite increases in the number of children suffering from psychosomatic disorders reported amid the growing ''classroom collapse'' phenomenon where class discipline breaks down to the point where teaching becomes impossible.
A 1989 study conducted by William McCown, Judith Johnson, and David Eddy found that male security officers have significantly elevated levels of psychopathology, including depression, schizophrenia, and psychosomatic disorders.
They are, she says, latter-day hysterias, psychosomatic disorders whose roots lie not in organic causes but in psychological distress.
There are many theories as to the etiology of psychosomatic disorders.
If psychosomatic disorders currently treated by non-psychiatrists, is also included the morbidity would rise to 15% (15 million people) (table 1 & 2).
The Niels-Stensen-Kliniken GmbH is the holder of five somatic hospitals, a clinic specializing in Psychiatry and Internal Medicine and a specialist clinic for psychological and psychosomatic disorders, 2 nursing homes, an educational institution for health professions as well as a service company in the Osnabrck area.
It addresses self-regulation and the soul-spiritual nature of the child, disorders following abnormal birth, disease prevention, digestive tract disorders and gastrointestinal diseases, inflammatory diseases, allergic diseases, psychosomatic disorders, neurological disorders, disorders and constitutional aspects of growth and morphogenesis, and extending treatment options for specific diseases like cardiac disease, cystic fibrosis, acne, and rheumatoid arthritis.
It might sound sinister, but the research conducted by neuropsychologist Professor Peter Halligan of Cardiff University could shed light on the causes of rare neurological or psychosomatic disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome.
Mr Brodie added: "It is plain from the medial records produced that Mr Aehmed was suffering at the time of the applications from psychosomatic disorders.