psychosomatic


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Related to psychosomatic: psychosomatic medicine, psychosomatic pain

psychosomatic

 [si″ko-so-mat´ik]
pertaining to the interrelations of mind and body; having bodily symptoms of psychic, emotional, or mental origin.
psychosomatic disorder (psychosomatic illness) a disorder in which the physical symptoms are caused or exacerbated by psychological factors, such as migraine headache, lower back pain, or irritable bowel syndrome; see also somatoform disorders. It is now recognized that emotional factors play a role in the development of nearly all organic illnesses and that the physical symptoms experienced by the patient are related to many interdependent factors, including psychological and cultural. The physical manifestations of an illness, unless caused by mechanical trauma, cannot be divorced from a person's emotional life. Each person responds in a unique way to stress; emotions affect one's sensitivity to trauma and to irritating elements in the environment, susceptibility to infection, and ability to recover from the effects of illness. Physical conditions to which psychological factors are shown to be contributory are currently classified as psychological factors affecting medical condition. Any physical condition can be so classified, but the most frequently included are asthma, peptic ulcer, bowel disorders, cardiovascular disorders, arthritis, allergy, headache, and certain endocrine disorders. In recent years there has been some success in using behavior therapy to treat these and other illnesses whose symptoms are related to the autonomic nervous system. Clients are taught new ways of coping with stress and new patterns of behavior. Among the techniques used are biofeedback, relaxation training, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning using social and material reinforcement.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sō-mat'ik),
Refers to the influence of the mind or psychological functioning of the brain on the physiologic functions of the body relative to bodily disorders or disease and the reciprocal impact of disease on psychological functioning. It can be used pejoratively, especially if it is thought that the possibility of secondary gain exists. See: psychophysiologic, psychogenic.
See also: placebo, nocebo.
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]

psychosomatic

/psy·cho·so·mat·ic/ (-sah-mat´ik) pertaining to the mind-body relationship; having bodily symptoms of psychic, emotional, or mental origin.

psychosomatic

(sī′kō-sō-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a disorder having physical symptoms but originating from mental or emotional causes.
2. Relating to or concerned with the influence of the mind on the body, and the body on the mind, especially with respect to disease: psychosomatic medicine.

psy′cho·so·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

psychosomatic

[sī′kōsəmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + soma, body
1 pertaining to psychosomatic medicine.
2 relating to, characterized by, or resulting from the interaction of the mind or psyche and the body.
3 relating to the expression of an emotional conflict through physical symptoms. See also conversion disorder, psychogenic, psychophysiological disorder.

psychosomatic

adjective Referring to symptoms that appear physical but are in fact caused by psychological stress.

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik)
Pertaining to the influence of the mind or higher functions of the brain (emotions, fears, desires) on the functions of the body, especially in relation to bodily disorders or disease.
See also: psychophysiologic
Synonym(s): psychophysical (2) .
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]

psychosomatic

1. Pertaining to the relationship between the mind and the body.
2. Pertaining to the apparent effect of mental and emotional factors in contributing to physical disorders. These definitions imply the possibly untenable assumptions enshrined in the long-held view (Cartesian dualism) that the mind and the body are distinct, separable entities.

Psychosomatic

Referring to physical symptoms that are caused or significantly influenced by emotional factors. Some doctors regard couvade syndrome as a psychosomatic condition.
Mentioned in: Couvade Syndrome

psy·cho·so·mat·ic

(sī'kō-sŏ-mat'ik)
Refers to influence of mind or psychological functioning of brain on physiologic functions of body relative to bodily disorders or disease and reciprocal impact of disease on psychological functioning.
[psycho- + G. sōma, body]

psychosomatic (sīkōsōmat´ik),

adj 1. pertaining to the expression of an emotional conflict through physical symptoms.
adj 2. pertaining to the mind-body relationship; having bodily symptoms of a psychic, emotional, or mental origin. See also disease, psychosomatic.
psychosomatic factors,
psychosomatic, medicine,
n the branch of medicine concerned with the interrelationships between mental and emotional reactions and somatic processes, in particular the manner in which intrapsychic conflicts influence physical symptoms.

psychosomatic

pertaining to the interrelations of mind and body; having bodily clinical signs of psychic, emotional or mental origin.

psychosomatic disease
there are no identified psychosomatic diseases in animals. Abomasal ulcer in bulls in artificial insemination centers, esophagogastric ulcer in pigs, ulcerative colitis in dogs are possible candidates for the classification. The suggested mechanism for the development of disease in this way is that the cerebral cortex (via the psyche) overrides the normal, adaptive, feedback mechanisms by which the pituitary gland regulates the secretion of corticosteroids in response to stress of any sort. For this reason the adrenal cortex is overstimulated, develops hyperadrenocorticism first and then exhaustion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The correlation analysis of the variables Distress and psychosomatic on the sample (N= 450), was found r = .
In short, there was a significant positive relationship between bullying and psychosomatic problems among school children and all forms of bullying were predictors of poor physical and psychological health.
Pozzoli found that bullied children had a significantly greater likelihood of experiencing psychosomatic problems, with an odds ratio of 2.
The psychosomatic school from Paris, elaborated a theory of psychosomatic economy, which presents the man from a holistic and metaphysic concept, considering the existence of a multifactor determinism which includes also the biological factor.
of Iowa) introduce psychosomatic medicine, or consultation-liaison psychiatry, and the range of disorders seen in the field.
A physician with experience in gastroenterology and psychosomatic medicine provided care for the EMC group.
This wide-ranging study explores the meanings of psychosomatic illness in works drawn from four classical genres: self-writing, the novel, comedy and tragedy.
The Use of Hypnosis in Anxiety, Phobia and Psychosomatic Disorders: An Eight-Year Review (Part One).
The patients that show psychosomatic comorbidities also have significantly higher levels of emotional distress, and this is the main driver of poor quality of life in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria.
It might sound sinister, but the research conducted by neuropsychologist Professor Peter Halligan of Cardiff University could shed light on the causes of rare neurological or psychosomatic disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome.
The Rush University study was published in the May 2009 issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

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