psychosocial


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psychosocial

 [si″ko-so´shal]
pertaining to or involving both psychic and social aspects.

psy·cho·so·cial

(sī'kō-sō'shăl),
Involving both psychological and social aspects; for example, age, education, marital and related aspects of a person's history.

psychosocial

/psy·cho·so·cial/ (si″ko-so´shul) pertaining to or involving both psychic and social aspects.

psychosocial

(sī′kō-sō′shəl)
adj.
Involving aspects of social and psychological behavior: a child's psychosocial development.

psy′cho·so′cial·ly adv.

psychosocial

[-sō′shəl]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + L, socialis, partners
pertaining to a combination of psychological and social factors.

psychosocial

adjective Referring to a person’s psychological development in, and interaction with, a social environment.

psy·cho·so·cial

(sī'kō-sō'shăl)
Involving both psychological and social aspects, e.g., age, education, marital history.

Psychosocial

A term referring to the mind's ability to, consciously or unconsciously, adjust and relate the body to its social environment.
Mentioned in: Failure to Thrive
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty-two Libyan Red Crescent volunteers gathered in Tunis this week to attend a five-day training of trainers in community-based psychosocial support.
Mental Health and Psycho-social Support (MHPSS) is a composite term used in guidelines to describe any type of local or outside support that aims to protect or promote psychosocial well-being and prevent or treat mental disorder.
Nobile and Drotar (2003) made a compelling case for the importance of parent-provider communication in pediatric care, noting "that effective parent-provider communication is associated with parental satisfaction with care, adherence to treatment recommendations, and enhanced discussion of psychosocial concerns" (p.
Only 1 case has been reported due to psychosocial risks and problems mainly because psychosocial risks are ill-addressed with a limited knowledge in developing countries and Malaysia is of no exception.
Wainwright and Thompson, who work in hospice care in Canada, show hospice and palliative care practitioners how to provide psychosocial care to patients and families experiencing bereavement or dying.
The Pediatric Dermatology Psychosocial Screen (PDPS) is being developed as a standardized tool to evaluate psychosocial stress related to birthmarks, skin diseases, and conditions affecting pigmentation or hair growth.
It is a violation of death penalty safeguards to impose capital punishment on individuals with a psychosocial disability,' the UN experts said in a joint statement issued by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).
This preliminary finding "supports the need for universal psychosocial screening in this population, with particular attention to families whose children have comorbid behavioral health problems," Dr.
This new phase of Psychosocial Intervention, characterized by the redefinition of the editorial team, had a pair of main objectives: increasing the journal's scientific quality and broadening its reach.
There is a need for more psychiatrists that can provide psychosocial care to respond (to these disasters)," Ignacio told a forum in San Juan.
The course was one of the main components of IOM's Psychosocial Assistance Programme for Crisis-Affected Families in Libya, launched in early 2012 and funded by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
In an analysis of sociodemographic, psychological, and illness-related factors in cancer patients, it has been demonstrated that female gender is an independent predictor of the need for psychosocial support (Ernstmann et al.