psychopharmacology

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psychopharmacology

 [si″ko-fahr″mah-kol´o-je]
1. the study of the action of drugs on psychological functions and mental states.
2. the use of drugs to modify psychological functions and mental states. adj., adj psychopharmacolog´ic.

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-far'mă-kol'ŏ-jē),
1. The use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. The science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]

psychopharmacology

/psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy/ (-fahr″mah-kol´-ah-je)
1. the study of the action of drugs on psychological functions and mental states.
2. the use of drugs to modify psychological functions and mental states.psychopharmacolog´ic

psychopharmacology

(sī′kō-fär′mə-kŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of pharmacology that deals with the study of the actions, effects, and development of psychoactive drugs.

psy′cho·phar′ma·co·log′ic (-kə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·phar′ma·co·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·phar′ma·col′o·gist n.

psychopharmacology

[-fär′məkol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + pharmakon, drug, logos, science
1 the scientific study of the effects of drugs on behavior and normal and abnormal mental functions.
2 the use of these drugs in the treatment of mental illness.

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-fahr'mă-kol'ŏ-jē)
1. The use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. The science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]

psychopharmacology

The study of drugs that affect the state of the mind and the behaviour.

psy·cho·phar·ma·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-fahr'mă-kol'ŏ-jē)
1. Use of drugs to treat mental and psychological disorders.
2. Science of drug-behavior relationships.
[psycho- + G. pharmakon, drug, + logos, study]

psychopharmacology, (sī´kōfär´məkol´əjē),

n the scientific study of the effects of drugs on behavior and normal and abnormal mental functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
president of the National Society of Clinical Psychopharmacologists, explained the motivation for the program.
Later, he concedes that "to be fair, most psychopharmacologists do, in fact, provide therapy to most of their patients.
As writers such as Ott (1996) and others maintain, the shamans were simply the psychopharmacologists of the ancient tribal worlds.
This casebook contains 10 psychiatric cases, each one accompanied by 8-14 essays on various features of the case, written by basic scientists, social scientists, clinicians, researchers, psychopharmacologists, and psychoanalysts.
O'Meara zeros in on the qualifying language psychopharmacologists and mental health professionals use.
Despite the lack of clear evidence for neuropathological, neurochemical, or genetic explanations for psychiatric disorders, the beliefs in such are heavily perpetuated by psychopharmacologists and physiological psychiatrists (Valenstein, 1998), who differ from the declining number of psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners who appreciate the contextual factors affecting mental health.
Other services are provided by social workers, medical staff, psychiatric nurses, psychopharmacologists, substance abuse professionals, and an activities staff that offers a clinical-free zone where patients can become students of woodworking, weaving, pottery, theater, photography, and horticulture.
The distance between the domains of psychotherapists and psychopharmacologists will continue to widen, however, as psychiatrists undoubtedly will continue to be the most-expensive mental health professionals.
The text is an essential guide for those who prescribe psychotropics or perform psychotherapy, including psychiatrists, residents, psychologists, and psychopharmacologists.