psychopharmaceuticals

psy·cho·phar·ma·ceu·ti·cals

(sī'kō-far'mă-sū'ti-kălz),
Drugs used in the treatment of emotional disorders.

psy·cho·phar·ma·ceu·ticals

(sīkō-fahrmă-sūtiks)
Drugs used in the treatment of emotional disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
This invariably makes interventions such as psychopharmaceuticals nothing more than a Band-Aid, and it brings into question the effectiveness of our standard of care.
Organic Empathy: Feminism, Psychopharmaceuticals, and the Embodiment of Depression" Material Feminisms.
Regardless, students have found the tool an effective means of learning or reinforcing understanding of psychopharmaceuticals.
Kaut (2011) encourages mental health counselors to consider biological reductionism as the preferred lens through which to understand both psychological and emotional symptoms and the high prevalence and superior efficacy of psychopharmaceuticals.
Some specific topics examined include psychopharmaceuticals as a medium of exchange in post-conflict Indonesia, gender stereotypes in the diagnosis of depression, medication of homeless women in uptown Chicago, and ecologies of will, information, and power in junkies, addicts, and patients.
Jackson's previous book, Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent, spoke of the need to recognize how useless and harmful psychopharmaceuticals can be, as well as the absolute necessity of protecting the rights of people who desire drug-free care.
31) Psychopharmaceuticals are increasing in popularity among the healthy who seek a competitive edge.
The use of psychopharmaceuticals is often related to family or work-related problems.
The direct impact of the psychiatric control of those identified as homosexual included, as Terry (1999) noted, "psychiatrists' inhumane use of psychopharmaceuticals, lobotomy, psychoanalysis, and aversion therapy" (p.
Launched with a March issue, the journal focuses on the ethical issues posed by new technologies developed via neuroscience, such as psychopharmaceuticals, the practice of neuroscience, the problems of legal regulation of neuroscientific technologies, and the ways in which the sciences of the mind relate to traditional moral and philosophical problems, such as the nature of free will, moral responsibility, self-deception, weakness of the will and the nature of self.
32) Kidney transplants are still rare, but many other specialty services are not, including x-rays, psychopharmaceuticals, and insulin therapy.