psychopathy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to psychopathy: antisocial personality disorder

psychopathy

 [si-kop´ah-the]
older term for a mental disorder, sometimes specifically antisocial personality disorder. adj., psychopath´ic.

psy·chop·a·thy

(sī-kop'ă-thē),
An older and inexact term referring to a pattern of antisocial or manipulative behavior engaged in by a psychopath.
See also: personality disorder.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease]

psychopathy

(sī-kŏp′ə-thē)
n.
1. A personality disorder characterized by deceitfulness, manipulation, grandiosity, lack of empathy or guilt, and often aggressive or violent behavior. It is sometimes considered a subset of antisocial personality disorder.
2. Mental illness. No longer in clinical use.

psychopathy

[sīkōp′əthē]
any disease of the mind, congenital or acquired, not necessarily associated with subnormal intelligence. Also called psychopathia.

psychopathy

 Antisocial personality disorder, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ullrich, "Subtypes of Psychopathy in the British Household Population: Findings from the National Household Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity," Soc Psychiatry Psychiatra Epidemiol 47, no.
Suggestions for the clinical and forensic use of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R).
Results showed that men were more likely than women to engage in trolling, and higher levels of trait psychopathy and sadism predicted trolling behaviour.
Nevertheless, many research papers seem to concur that psychopathy is much more prevalent in corporate management than among the general population.
Psychopathy refers to tendency to be impulsive, non-empathetic, and to be involved in anti-social activities (Neumann and Hare, 2008).
This is why psychopathy is the only mental disorder where the risk of instrumental aggression is increased, this type of violence is purposeful and goal directed and can be planned and executed without autonomic activation.
Conventional treatments for aggression and psychopathy bypass the emotions, emphasizing rewards and punishments to change unwanted behaviors.
Modern notions of psychopathy have been heavily influenced by psychiatrist Hervey Cleckley.