psychopathology


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Related to psychopathology: psychopathy

psychopathology

 [si″ko-pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the causes and processes of mental disorders.
2. abnormal, maladaptive behavior or mental activity.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē),
1. The science concerned with the pathology of the mind and behavior.
2. The science of mental and behavioral disorders, including psychiatry and abnormal psychology.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]

psychopathology

/psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy/ (-pah-thol´ah-je)
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the causes and processes of mental disorders.
2. abnormal, maladaptive behavior or mental activity.

psychopathology

(sī′kō-pə-thŏl′ə-jē, -pă-)
n.
1. The study of the origin, development, and manifestations of mental or behavioral disorders.
2. The manifestation of a mental or behavioral disorder.

psy′cho·path′o·log′ic (-păth′ə-lŏj′ĭk), psy′cho·path′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
psy′cho·pa·thol′o·gist n.

psychopathology

[-pəthol′əjē]
1 the study of the causes, processes, and manifestations of mental disorders.
2 the behavioral manifestation of any mental disorder. See also psychiatry.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the pathology of the mind and behavior.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]

psychopathology

The study of the nature of abnormal mental processes and their effects on behaviour.

Psychopathology

A mental disorder or illness, such as schizophrenia, personality disorder, or major depressive disorder.

psy·cho·pa·thol·o·gy

(sī'kō-pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
1. Science concerned with pathology of mind and behavior.
2. Science of mental and behavioral disorders.
[psycho- + G. pathos, disease, + logos, study]

psychopathology,

n 1. the study of the causes, processes, and manifestations of mental disorders.
n 2. the behavioral manifestation of any mental disorder.

psychopathology

the pathology of mental disease. No branch of veterinary medicine deals with this subject.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, the traditional focus in many psychopathology courses is primarily on learning the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM; APA, 2013) typology regarding the assessment, classification and diagnosis of mental illness.
Hassim and Wagner define psychopathology as 'mental illness or anguish, or signs of behaviours and occurrences which may denote mental illness or psychological wounding'.
This collective body of evidence concluded that non-heterosexuality formed a direct risk factor in the development of eating disordered psychopathology in males (Wichstrom, 2006).
IQ was considered for use as a covariate not only for its known effect on achievement, but also for its significant effect at baseline and over time on psychopathology as measured by behavioral checklists (de Ruiter, Dekker, Verhulst, & Koot, 2007).
The instrument used was a self-administered questionnaire that elicited data regarding, demographic characteristics, substance use and psychopathology (PTSD, depression and anxiety).
The range of psychopathology associated with NSSI these studies found suggests much diagnostic heterogeneity among those who self-injure, yet there are few empirical studies assessing NSSI and other disorders.
For example, few studies have examined whether risk for intergenerational psychopathology in offspring of depressed parents varies as a function of child gender (Goodman & Gotlib, 2002).
Maternal smoking during pregnancy and psychopathology in offspring followed to adulthood.
Psychopathology can distort the developmental course of personal devotion across childhood.
Carrying readers through Rankin's skillfully crafted, articulate and original novel that reveals the psychopathology underlying a criminal life, Boot Tracks follows Rankin through his meeting of Florence and their rapid attraction to one another.
A group of outside activists and gay psychiatrists and psychologists presented the Committee with arguments made by Evelyn Hooker and Alfred Kinsey that homosexuality was not associated with psychopathology and that all other studies on homosexuality were intrinsically flawed, because of sampling bias.
He points out that developmental psychopathology is not merely the study of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence--it is the study of how psychopathology emerges and changes in a developmental context, structured and guided by what is known about normal biological, cognitive, emotional, and social development during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.