psychooncology

psy·cho·on·col·o·gy

(sī'kō-ong-kol'ŏ-jē),
The psychological aspects of the treatment and management of the patient with cancer; it combines elements of psychiatry, psychology, and medicine with special concern for the psychosocial needs of the patient and his or her family.

psychooncology

[sī′kō·ongkol′əjē]
the psychological effects of cancer, particularly the psychosocial needs of the patient and the patient's family.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2010), where only 25 percent of breast and medical oncology patients who were referred to the psychooncology service after positive distress screening actually accepted the referral.
Mitchell of the Leicester (England) Royal Infirmary for use in screening cancer patients for depression and anxiety (Psychooncology 2010;19:125-33; Psychooncology 2010;19:134-40).
International Psychosocial Oncology Society 11th World Congress of PsychoOncology, Vienna, 2008, Abstr.
The Impact of Psychosocial Factors on Progression of Breast Cancer Through Immune and Endocrine Mechanisms," Psychooncology, 3, pp.
Depression in stem-cell transplant and chemotherapy-treated oncology patients has received increased attention in psychooncology research during the past decade.
Principal Investigator; Director, Center for Psychooncology and Palliative Care Research; Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Jennifer Temel, M.
London paid to the underserved field of psychooncology and the recognition that psychiatrists, working in tandem with hematologists/oncologists, can improve the quality of life of cancer patients and cancer survivors ("Psychiatry and Medicine Working Together," The Psychiatrist's Toolbox, June 2005, p.
Riba's career as well: She is associate chair for education and academic affairs in the department of psychiatry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of the university's psychooncology program.
Manne, director, psychooncology program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia.