psychoneuroimmunology


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psy·cho·neu·ro·im·mun·ol·ogy

(sī'kō-nū'rō-im'ū-nol'ō-jē),
An area of study that focuses on emotional and other psychological states that affect the immune system, rendering the patient less or more susceptible to disease or the course of a disease.
[psycho- + neuro- + immunology]

psychoneuroimmunology

/psy·cho·neu·ro·im·mu·nol·o·gy/ (-noor″o-im″u-nol´ah;-je) the study of the interactions between psychological factors, the central nervous system, and immune function as modulated by the neuroendocrine system.

psychoneuroimmunology

(sī′kō-no͝or′ō-ĭm′yə-nŏl′ə-jē, -nyo͝or′-)
n.
The study of the interaction of behavioral, neural, and endocrine factors and the functioning of the immune system.

psychoneuroimmunology

[-noo͡r′ō·imyo̅o̅nol′əjē]
a discipline that studies the relationships between psychological states and the immune response.

psychoneuroimmunology

The formal study of the effects of mental and neurological status on the immune system. Psychoneuroimmunology is an evolving hybrid of several disciplines that studies the complex bidirectional interactions between the nervous and immune systems, where the neuroendocrine system modulates immune function and nervous and immune interactions influence psychosocial dynamics.

psychoneuroimmunology

PNI The study of the effects of the mental and neurological status on the immune system.

psychoneuroimmunology

The discipline concerned with the effect of the emotions on the immune system and hence on the development of disease. Psychoneuroimmunology is not predicated on the proposition that the mind and the body are discrete entities that interact via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; it is based on the growing recognition that mental and physical events are so inextricably inter-related that nothing of importance can happen to one without affecting the other.

psychoneuroimmunology (sīˈ·kō·nerˈ·ō·imˈ·yōō·nˑ·l·gē),

n the study of the integrated interactions of the immunologic, neurologic, and psychologic systems and their effects on health.

psy·cho·neu·ro·im·mu·nol·o·gy

(sī'kō-nū'rō-im'yū-nol'ŏ-jē)
Area of study that focuses on emotional and other psychological states that affect the immune system, rendering the patient less or more susceptible to disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
He discusses the latest developments in psychoneuroimmunology with his holiness Dalai Lama and other scientists of the Western world.
His interests include: existential neurosis, psychology of health, spirituality, and psychoneuroimmunology.
Another recent study, done at the University of California at Los Angeles Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, has provided evidence of the ability of individuals to regulate their own immune systems.
Subsequent research over the last 20 years has demonstrated again with rigorous science that there is a continuous dialogue between the mind and the body and the immune system termed by Ader as psychoneuroimmunology (PNI).
Psychoneuroendocrinology and psychoneuroimmunology of cancer: Plausible mechanisms worth pursuing?
The research published in Biological Psychiatry was federally funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Science Foundation, with additional funding from and UCLA's Center for Psychoneuroimmunology.
The link between religion and health: Psychoneuroimmunology and the faith factor.
Meanwhile the new science of psychoneuroimmunology is proving that the brain is communicating aptly and constantly with every cell in the human body.
Given that research in psychoneuroimmunology has also found associations between emotions and immunity (e.
I would suggest that this could be explained by psychoneuroimmunology, in which stressors appear to provoke an immune response that can lead to damage of normal tissues if it is prolonged.
By way of another example, advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology demonstrated how chronic and acute emotional states influence immune system functioning rendering individuals more or less susceptible to infection and more or less likely to recover from illness (Forlenza & Baum, 2002; Ironson, Balbin, & Schneiderman, 2002; Kiecolt-Glaser, McGuire, Robles, & Glaser, 2002).
BB: Gary, the biological responses I'm describing fall into the realm of Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), the medical discipline that studies the interactions of mind and body.