psychometry

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psychometry

 [si-kom´et-re]
the testing and measuring of mental and psychological ability, efficiency, potentials, and functioning. adj., adj psychomet´ric.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī-kom'ĕ-trē),
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]

psychometry

/psy·chom·e·try/ (si-kom´ĕ-tre) the testing and measuring of mental and psychologic ability, efficiency, potentials, and functioning.psychomet´ric

psychometry

(sī-kŏm′ĭ-trē)

psychometry

Fringe medicine  
(1) Psychometric analysis, see there.
(2) Object reading, see there.

Mainstream psychology
(1) Any test used to measure a psychologic variable (e.g., abilities, intelligence, moods, personality). The term “psychometric testing” is increasingly preferred, given the potential for confusing legitimate psychological testing formats with pseudoscientific methods.
(2) The science of testing and measuring mental and psychologic ability, efficiency potentials and functioning—e.g., psychopathologic components.

psy·chom·e·try

(sī'kom'ĕ-trē)
The discipline pertaining to psychological and mental testing, and to any quantitative analysis of a person's psychological traits or attitudes or mental processes.
Synonym(s): psychometrics.
[psycho- + G. metron, measure]

psychometry

The measurement of psychological functions, including correlative ability, memory, aptitudes, concentration and response to logical puzzles. Intelligence has never been adequately defined and so there are no tests for pure intelligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
All this means that instead of the vague term intelligence psychometrists can use these tests of g, despite their admitted defects as scientific measures, as operational measurements of intelligence which lead to useful predictions and theorizing.
estimated subscale intercorrelations will always be lower than the true value for the subscale intercorrelation, because of what psychometrists call "attenuation due to unreliability.
Moreover, cultural differences should not be misinterpreted as lack of motivation, but should be noted by psychometrists as observations, which may be attributable to socioculture factors.