psycholinguistics

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psycholinguistics

 [si″ko-ling-gwis´tiks]
the study of psychological factors involved in the development and use of language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks),
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, that affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psycholinguistics

(sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of language as a form of behavior, including language development, speech, and personality.

psycholinguistics

Psychology The study of factors affecting activities of communicating and understanding verbal information; the study of the manner in which language is acquired, stored, integrated and retrieved. See Kinesics, Language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, which affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive psycholinguists hold that words are not labels for objects but rather tags for concepts.
Typically, the various approaches to the representation of morphologically complex words have been tested by psycholinguists in priming experiments, which measure the effect of presenting either an identical or otherwise related item on a person's subsequent performance involving the repeated item or an item related to the prime (see, for example, Meyer and Ruddy 1974; Monsell, 1985 for a full discussion of components of priming).
MacNeilage set out his position in the August 1998 BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES and received generally favorable comments in 27 published peer reviews from psycholinguists and developmental psychologists.
Although developmental psycholinguists are less often guided by applied contexts, the data described above may offer bridges between the basic and applied contexts in behavior analysis.
Psycholinguists have researched proverb comprehension with the aim of uncovering the unconscious mental processes employed in understanding nonliteral language.
For instance, psycholinguists established nearly 20 years ago that people presented with true and false sentences generally take less time to determine the accuracy of the true statements.
As psycholinguists put it, narrative texts activate readers' past experiential traces--the memories of their past sensorimotor interactions with the environment (see e.
The first concerns observations of rapid acquisition and retention of vocabulary, termed learning by exclusion by behavior analysts and fast mapping by psycholinguists (see, e.
For phonologists, phoneticians, psycholinguists, researchers in first and second language acquisition, and cognitive scientists.
In the field of predictability, the effort of both morphologists and psycholinguists has been primarily concentrated on primary compounds.
In addition, as long as behavior analysts have not refuted this component, it is very unlikely that a dialogue can be established between them and psycholinguists.
For phoneticians, speech scientists, psycholinguists, applied linguists, and pedagogical specialists.