psycholinguistics

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psycholinguistics

 [si″ko-ling-gwis´tiks]
the study of psychological factors involved in the development and use of language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks),
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, that affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psycholinguistics

(sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of language as a form of behavior, including language development, speech, and personality.

psycholinguistics

Psychology The study of factors affecting activities of communicating and understanding verbal information; the study of the manner in which language is acquired, stored, integrated and retrieved. See Kinesics, Language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, which affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, it is not the utterance that is overly restricted, as psycholinguists imply, but it is the controlling stimulus complex that is overly restricted (selected).
While psycholinguists have discarded this deterministic theory (called the Whorfian "strong hypothesis"), social science research has supported an alternative theory that language affects thought and action (called the Whorfian "weak hypothesis").
Psychologist Bennett Bertenthal (University of Chicago, USA), and psycholinguists Sotaro Kita (University of Bristol, UK) and Susan Duncan (University of Chicago, USA) pointed out how gestures form an intimate connection with human speech.
Even if the affix-stripping model allows storage economy, it has been severely criticized by a number of psycholinguists (see Aitchison 1987; Butterworth 1983; Henderson 1985, 1989, for an extensive discussion).
Psycholinguists substantially agree that when an auditory sentence is processed, acoustic information is transformed into phonetic information and stored in working memory.
I spent a lot of time with people in Al [artificial intelligence] and I learned a little bit more about their concerns, but I also taught part time at [name of university omitted] and so I spent time there with philosophers and people interested in language, mostly psycholinguists.
These are the types of clues sought by forensic psycholinguists when conducting threat assessments, authorship identification, and other tasks that demand analysis of language.
However, my analysis is based on empirical research by psycholinguists and communication experts and potentially is demonstrable in a court of law.
Comparing stories from different cultures, psycholinguists and cognitive psychologists came to the conclusion that narratives share a common basic template (Labov, 1972, Labov & Waletsky, 1967, Mandler, 1982, Hatch, 1999).
Psycholinguists would probably argue that core words are those which are most perceptually salient; that is, they mark dominant areas of cote sensory perception such as size (large/small), weight (heavy/light), colour (red/green) (but not mauve or scarlet or fawn).
The theory of the critical period has been reviewed by a number of psycholinguists, and both age limits--upper and lower--have been called into question again.
Psycholinguists define reading as an active process based on this interaction that is simultaneously creative and predictive.