psycholinguistics

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psycholinguistics

 [si″ko-ling-gwis´tiks]
the study of psychological factors involved in the development and use of language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks),
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, that affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psycholinguistics

(sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of language as a form of behavior, including language development, speech, and personality.

psycholinguistics

Psychology The study of factors affecting activities of communicating and understanding verbal information; the study of the manner in which language is acquired, stored, integrated and retrieved. See Kinesics, Language.

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of a host of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules, which affect communication and understanding of language.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]

psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

(sī'kō-ling-gwis'tiks)
Study of psychological factors associated with speech, including voice, attitudes, emotions, and grammatical rules.
[psycho- + L. lingua, tongue]
References in periodicals archive ?
More work remains to be done to confirm that parental talk affects how babies cry, remarks psycholinguist D.
These 18 papers are drawn from those presented at a May 2005 meeting of linguists, lexicogaphers, translation studies theorists and practitioners, a psycholinguist and even a philosopher.
The team first examined whether the Piraha employ counting words, as was described in a 2004 study conducted by psycholinguist Peter Gordon of Columbia University.
This work draws on work by behavioral psycholinguist Esper (1925, 1973) who organized artificial linguistic systems into matrices.
The use of sophisticated statistical methods to quantify how words evolve on the basis of the frequency of their use "is an important step forward, remarks psycholinguist W.
Psycholinguist Smith--a long-established writer and researcher on subjects related to language, learning, and teaching (he's a passionate advocate of whole-language teaching of reading)--here considers how identities are created through myths, consciousness, language, technology, differences, limitations, and ideas.
A psycholinguist who studied the Piraha people disagrees with Everett.
As psycholinguist Ira Noveck and his colleagues have found, "Universally longer reading times for sentences containing unanticipated metaphoric references is one piece of evidence revealing of [the cognitive] costs" of metaphor (119).
1983, 1992, 1999) is a psycholinguist who years ago began a remarkably detailed and painstaking reanalysis of the original data from Roger Brown's (e.
Recent investigations of Chinese readers suggest that people everywhere invoke core neural responses in order to read, but other types of brain activity are necessary to attain mastery of alphabetic or non-alphabetic writing systems, psycholinguist Charles A.
To make it observable, says the psycholinguist, you must assign the language user some particular performative task (Derwing 1980: 176).
Already lauded by psycholinguist Steven Pinker as "the most important book in the sciences of languages to have appeared in many years," Jackendoff's work is a sweeping survey of every major aspect of language and communication.