psychogenetic


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psy·cho·gen·e·tic

(sī-kō-gĕ-net'ik),
Refers to the interplay between genetic variability and psychological and psychiatric phenomena.
See also: psychogenic.
[psycho- + genetic]

psychogenetic

(sī″kō-jĕn-ĕt′ĭk)
1. Originating in the mind, as a disease.
2. Concerning formation of mental traits.

psy·cho·gen·e·tic

(sī-kō-gĕ-net'ik)
Refers to the interplay between genetic variability and psychological and psychiatric phenomena.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2) For details, see Martin van Creveld, The Rise and Decline of the State (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999); Norbert Elias, The Civilizing Process : Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic lnvestigations (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2000); Anthony Giddens, The Nation-State and Violence (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987).
Elias's ideas are found in the second volume of his The Civilizing Process : Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000).
Without slighting Freud's psychogenetic approach to the role of father, S.
The basic stratum of the personality and the associated underlying belief systems that hold it in place derive from a number of factors: the shadow aspects of parents; the same unresolved elements in the lives of grandparents (the ovum from which the mother sprang was already formed at eleven weeks gestation in the maternal grandmother); a commensurate and immeasurable twine of psychogenetic ancestral memories; the prenate's own "baggage" from pre-conception; the experience of the conception itself; the phenomenology of implantation; and the whole duration of the gestation period; all together form layers of affect in this self-forging process.