psychogenesis


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psychogenesis

 [si″ko-jen´ĕ-sis]
1. mental development.
2. the production of a symptom or illness by psychic factors.

psy·cho·gen·e·sis

(sī'kō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The origin and development of the psychic processes including mental, behavioral, emotional, personality, and related psychological processes.
Synonym(s): psychogeny
[psycho- + G. genesis, origin]

psychogenesis

/psy·cho·gen·e·sis/ (-jen´ĭ-sis)
1. mental development.
2. production of a symptom or illness by psychic factors.

psychogenesis

(sī′kə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. The origin and development of psychological processes, personality, or behavior.
2. Development of a disorder or illness resulting from psychological rather than physiological factors.

psy′cho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
psy′cho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

psychogenesis

[sī′kōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + genesis, origin
1 the development of the mind or of a mental function or process.
2 the development or production of a physical symptom or disease having a mental or psychic origin rather than an organic cause.
3 the development of emotional states, either normal or abnormal, from the interaction of conscious and unconscious psychological forces. Compare somatogenesis.

psy·cho·gen·e·sis

(sī'kō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The origin and development of the psychic processes, including mental, behavioral, emotional, personality, and related psychological processes.
[psycho- + G. genesis, origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
In 'Contributions to the psychogenesis of manic-depressive states', Klein (1935:262) explains:
We see then that the process of symbol formation in the psychogenesis of the individual is subject to an explicit institutionalisation--one may even say a recapitulation--on the collective level.
To see how it works in the middle years of the silent era, I am to study how the infant becomes the topical problem in Raoul Walsh's Regeneration (1915), a feature film (six reels, of a duration of 72 minutes) whose very title appears to allegorize a drama of psychogenesis in which progress and regress are mixed.
A short review of the shooting sequence can serve to indicate how film and psychogenesis are blended.
In any case, by adding psychogenesis to somatogenesis, and psychogenic diseases (for example, perversions) to somatogenic diseases (for example, pneumonia), Freud expanded the conceptual categories of etiology and pathology.
For Klein's argument on mourning and depression see Melanie Klein, "A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States" (1935), in Love, Guilt and Reparation 262-89 and "Mourning and Its Relation to Manic-Depressive States" 344-69.
Without venturing in the direction of clinical research in subjectivity and psychogenesis (e.
5; see also his "The Psychogenesis of a Case of Homosexuality in a Woman").
Amnestic states in war neurosis: The psychogenesis of fugues.
Thus Winnicott uses the language of illusion to describe the origins of creativity and play, the psychogenesis of our capacities to think symbolically, to form relationships and to contribute to cultural activity.
Pointing out that, in our "endless prosopopoeia" (giving a voice to the absent or dead), "which is not our strategy as subjects, since we are its product rather than its agent," "it would be naive" to believe that its meaning "can be a source of value," de Man comes to much the same conclusion (and again with the aid of Saussure) that Flournoy reached in his pioneer study, though, unlike Flournoy, he does not explore the psychogenesis of the "madness of words" as they function autonomously as a "positing power" in a "subliminal" realm.