psychodynamics


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Related to psychodynamics: psychoanalysis, Humanistic psychology

psychodynamics

 [si″ko-di-nam´iks]
the science of mental forces and motivations that influence human behavior and mental activity, including recognition of the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks),
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion. See: role-playing.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psychodynamics

/psy·cho·dy·nam·ics/ (-di-nam´iks) the interplay of motivational forces that gives rise to the expression of mental processes, as in attitudes, behavior, or symptoms.

psychodynamics

(sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psychodynamics

[-dīnam′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + dynamis, power
the study of the forces that motivate behavior. It may include the influence of past experiences on present behavior and the influence of mental and emotional forces on development and behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion.
See also: role-playing
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
Systematized study and theory of psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]
References in periodicals archive ?
The psychodynamics of opposite-gender identities illuminates the reality that in these cases same-sex sexual behavior is often formed as a psychological adaptation to cope with trauma.
1993, The psychodynamics of work and organizations, Guilford, New York.
Fear, as defined within the psychodynamics of work, deals with the anxiety and stress generated by risks that are inherent to professional activity and produced by this activity.
Use of a psychodynamic life narrative in the treatment of depression in the physically ill.
She starts with the psychological and thus winds up with primarily a psychodynamic analysis.
Aden notes the psychodynamics of our difficulty with living in the present, thus distorting our experience of life and death, unable to affirm life because we cannot accept our failings and forgiveness.
Thurer comments that "the power of a child's own psychodynamics should not be underestimated" (xxii).
Add concern for a political legacy and a place in history and until he goes we must watch him wrestle with his psychodynamics.
The psychodynamics of underachievement and self-destructive behavior in a group of exceptionally gifted adolescents and young adults: A psychiatrist's view.
A mind bears some similarities to an onion; it is organized around layers of psychodynamics driven by constellations of evaluative habits.
In the context of interwar psychology, this insight along with a broader interest in Freudian psychodynamics led to a body of work that attempted to link childrearing practices to adult personality, and thus to the social and cultural forms most congenial to those average, or modal, personality types.
Phyllis Chesler may help us to assemble these puzzle pieces with her precis of recent work in the psychodynamics of terrorism: "Both male and female infants and children are brought up by mothers (who are debased and traumatized women).