psychodynamics

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Related to psychodynamically: Psychodynamic perspective

psychodynamics

 [si″ko-di-nam´iks]
the science of mental forces and motivations that influence human behavior and mental activity, including recognition of the role of unconscious motivation in human behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks),
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion. See: role-playing.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psychodynamics

/psy·cho·dy·nam·ics/ (-di-nam´iks) the interplay of motivational forces that gives rise to the expression of mental processes, as in attitudes, behavior, or symptoms.

psychodynamics

(sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psychodynamics

[-dīnam′iks]
Etymology: Gk, psyche + dynamis, power
the study of the forces that motivate behavior. It may include the influence of past experiences on present behavior and the influence of mental and emotional forces on development and behavior.

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
The systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation and the functional significance of emotion.
See also: role-playing
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

(sī'kō-dī-nam'iks)
Systematized study and theory of psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation.
[psycho- + G. dynamis, force]
References in periodicals archive ?
Integrating families into a healing community: The use of structural and strategic family therapy in a psychodynamically oriented hospital.
Contemporary psychodynamically oriented therapists, for example, generally do not self-disclose in order to maintain a therapeutic frame that fosters exploration of the client's internal world.
In those sessions, the learning aspect, which appeared to be psychodynamically oriented, had failed.
Not only did the authors present their ideas as if they were original, they presented ideas that are by now, from my psychodynamically trained position, good old common sense.
In light of these developments, the general purpose of this three-article series is to outline a rationale and theoretical trajectory for a more psychodynamically informed moral motive model of spiritual transformation, one that eventually offers clear and specific suggestions for therapeutic and practical theology methods.
Psychodynamically, these patients have passive-dependent personality disorder.
Whereas psychodynamically oriented clinicians tend to focus on early childhood experiences or intrapsychic states, cognitive-behavioral-oriented clinicians emphasize identifying and treating dysfunctional modes of thinking and relating to others.
In psychodynamically informed models of RS a variety of constructs could be used to describe these mediating structures of personality.
Atkinson knows that many, many licensed clinical social workers are psychodynamically trained and practice in a way that might even meet the standards of psychiatry.
As a start, I have elsewhere proposed a psychodynamically informed revised model of the apophatic "doctrine of three ways" (Leffel, 2004; Strawn & Leffel, 2001).
Psychodynamically determined reactions and emotions that originate from lifelong, unconscious psychological conflicts and perceptions (Can.
The therapy for DID is long-term, psychodynamically informed psychotherapy.